cover crop


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cover crop

n.
A crop, such as winter rye or clover, planted between periods of regular crop production to prevent erosion and typically turned under before maturity to increase the soil's organic matter and nitrogen content.

cover crop

n
(Agriculture) a crop planted between main crops to prevent leaching or soil erosion or to provide green manure

cov′er crop`


n.
a crop, usu. a legume, planted to keep nutrients from leaching, soil from eroding, and land from weeding over, as during the winter.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cover crop - crop planted to prevent soil erosion and provide green manure
crop - a cultivated plant that is grown commercially on a large scale
References in periodicals archive ?
A cover crop of Mucuna bracteata, a leguminous plant, prevents soil erosion (protects water resources), stops weeds (reduces chemical spraying), and fixes nitrogen (increases soil fertility).
The Valmar acquisition offers Salford an expanded product line that now includes: primary, secondary, and vertical tillage, air seeders, commodity carts, cover crop seeders, spinner-type fertilizer spreaders, air-boom applicators and granular applicators for fertiliser, insecticide, seed, seed inoculant and forage preservatives.
After successfully applying no-till and cover crop practices within his farming community, Renner used his conservation knowledge to help the surrounding area.
References Cover crop is one of the most important methods of sustaining soil fertility and supporting plant health and to improve soil fertility and quality, reduce erosion, suppress weeds, and ultimately improve yields.
Depending on geographic location, season, and soil type, the choice of cover crop can change.
Some of the many different cover crop options include red clover, rye, oats, radish, alfalfa and wheat.
9 acres of wildlife cover crop must be planted and left unharvested for wildlife food plots.
Removing dead plants, planting a cover crop, and mulching benefits the next season's garden.
However, there is a differential effect between cover crop species with regard to their organic carbon addition to the system (STEENWERTH & BELINA, 2008), mainly due to the fact that the species used as cover crops in vineyards have a differentiated capacity to establish within the vineyards, and may even produce less biomass compared to the weeds that occur spontaneously in the area (BUGG et al.