coward


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Related to coward: Noel Coward

cow·ard

 (kou′ərd)
n.
One who shows ignoble fear in the face of danger or pain.

[Middle English, from Old French couard, from coue, tail, from Latin cauda.]

cow′ard adj.
Word History: A coward is one who "turns tail." The word comes from Old French couart, coart, "coward," and is related to Italian codardo, "coward." Couart is formed from coe, a northern French dialectal variant of cue, "tail" (from Latin cōda), to which the derogatory suffix -ard was added. This suffix appears in bastard, laggard, and sluggard, to name a few. In heraldry a lion couard, "cowardly lion," was depicted with his tail between his legs. So a coward may be one with his tail hidden between his legs or one who turns tail and runs like a rabbit, with his tail showing.

coward

(ˈkaʊəd)
n
a person who shrinks from or avoids danger, pain, or difficulty
[C13: from Old French cuard, from coue tail, from Latin cauda; perhaps suggestive of a frightened animal with its tail between its legs]

Coward

(ˈkaʊəd)
n
(Biography) Sir Noël (Pierce). 1899–1973, English dramatist, actor, and composer, noted for his sophisticated comedies, which include Private Lives (1930) and Blithe Spirit (1941)

cow•ard

(ˈkaʊ ərd)

n.
1. a person who shows shameful lack of courage or fortitude.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a coward.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French couard-, couart cowardly, derivative of coue tail < Latin cauda]

Cow•ard

(ˈkaʊ ərd)

n.
Noel, 1899–1973, English playwright.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coward - a person who shows fear or timiditycoward - a person who shows fear or timidity
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
cur - a cowardly and despicable person
dastard - a despicable coward
craven, poltroon, recreant - an abject coward
trembler, quaker - one who quakes and trembles with (or as with) fear
shrinking violet, shy person - someone who shrinks from familiarity with others
milksop, Milquetoast, pantywaist, sissy, pansy - a timid man or boy considered childish or unassertive
hesitater, hesitator, vacillator, waverer - one who hesitates (usually out of fear)
2.Coward - English dramatist and actor and composer noted for his witty and sophisticated comedies (1899-1973)

coward

noun wimp, chicken (slang), scaredy-cat (informal), sneak, funk (informal), craven (informal), pussy (slang, chiefly U.S.), yellow-belly (slang), poltroon The man's just a lily-livered coward.
Quotations
"Cowards die many times before their deaths" [William Shakespeare Julius Caesar]
"coward: one who in a perilous emergency thinks with his legs" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"May coward shame distain his name,"
"The wretch that dares not die!" [Robert Burns McPherson's Farewell]
"All men would be cowards if they durst" [John Wilmot A Satire against Mankind]

coward

noun
An ignoble, uncourageous person:
Translations
جَبانجَبَان
zbabělec
bangebukskujon
pelkuri
kukavica
gyáva
hugleysingi
臆病者
겁쟁이
bailumas
ģļēvulis
strahopetec
fegismes
คนขี้ขลาด
người nhút nhát

coward

[ˈkaʊəd] Ncobarde mf

coward

[ˈkaʊərd] nlâche mf
She's a coward → C'est une lâche.

coward

nFeigling m

coward

[ˈkaʊəd] nvigliacco/a

coward

(ˈkauəd) noun
a person who shows fear easily or is easily frightened. I am such a coward – I hate going to the dentist.
ˈcowardly adjective
ˈcowardice (-dis) noun
ˈcowardliness noun

coward

جَبَان zbabělec kujon Feigling δειλός cobarde pelkuri lâche kukavica codardo 臆病者 겁쟁이 lafaard feiging tchórz covarde трус fegis คนขี้ขลาด korkak người nhút nhát 胆小鬼

coward

a. cobarde, pusilánime.
References in classic literature ?
Damon was not a coward, but the giant iguana was not pleasant to look at.
Celina's husband was a fool, a coward, and a pig, and to prove it to her, Victor intended to hammer his head into a jelly the next time he encountered him.
The biggest coward I ever knew as called Lyon; and his wife, Patience, would scold you out of hearing in less time than a hunted deer would run a rod.
It's THERE-- the coward horror, there for the last time
I am no coward, but what to make of this head-peddling purple rascal altogether passed my comprehension.
Because there were two boats in his wake, and he supposed, no doubt, that they would of course come up to Pip very quickly, and pick him up; though, indeed, such considerations towards oarsmen jeopardized through their own timidity, is not always manifested by the hunters in all similar instances; and such instances not unfrequently occur; almost invariably in the fishery, a coward, so called, is marked with the same ruthless detestation peculiar to military navies and armies.
I never saw him so angry before; but as Bill was still howling and whining, like the coward that he was, he did not give him any more punishment of that kind, but set him up on a stool for the rest of the afternoon, and said that he should not go out to play for that week.
There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherd- sons -- not a one.
The laughed at him, and called him coward, liar, sneak, and other sorts of pet names, and told him they meant to call Chambers by a new name after this, and make it common in the town--"Tom Driscoll's nigger pappy,"--to signify that he had had a second birth into this life, and that Chambers was the author of his new being.
Because my innocent pure girl here at my side wouldn't marry that rich, insolent, ignorant coward, Brace Dunlap, who's been sniveling here over a brother he never cared a brass farthing for--"[I see Tom give a jump and look glad THIS time, to a dead certainty]"-- and in that moment I've told you about, I forgot my God and remembered only my heart's bitterness, God forgive me, and I struck to kill.
Minnie's face was not pleasant to see, for a coward detected at the moment of wrongdoing is not an object of delight.
I have preyed on my own morbid coward heart, and it has preyed on me.