cowboy


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cow·boy

 (kou′boi′)
n.
1. A hired man, especially in the western United States, who tends cattle and performs many of his duties on horseback. Also called cowman; also called regionally buckaroo, vaquero, waddy2. See Note at buckaroo
2. An adventurous hero.
3. Slang A reckless person, such as a driver, pilot, or manager, who ignores potential risks.

cowboy

(ˈkaʊˌbɔɪ)
n
1. (Agriculture) Also called: cowhand a hired man who herds and tends cattle, usually on horseback, esp in the western US
2. (Historical Terms) a conventional character of Wild West folklore, films, etc
3. informal
a. a person who is an irresponsible or unscrupulous operator in business
b. (as modifier): cowboy contractors; cowboy shop steward.
4. (Agriculture) Austral a man or boy who tends cattle
ˈcowˌgirl fem n

cow•boy

(ˈkaʊˌbɔɪ)

n.
1. a man, usu. on horseback, who herds and tends cattle.
2. a reckless vehicle driver.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cowboy - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horsebackcowboy - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horseback
buckaroo, buckeroo, vaquero - local names for a cowboy (`vaquero' is used especially in southwestern and central Texas and `buckaroo' is used especially in California)
cowgirl - a woman cowboy
gaucho - a cowboy of the South American pampas
horse wrangler, wrangler - a cowboy who takes care of the saddle horses
ranch hand - a hired hand on a ranch
roper - a cowboy who uses a lasso to rope cattle or horses
2.cowboy - a performer who gives exhibitions of riding and roping and bulldoggingcowboy - a performer who gives exhibitions of riding and roping and bulldogging
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
3.cowboy - someone who is reckless or irresponsible (especially in driving vehicles)
adventurer, venturer - a person who enjoys taking risks

cowboy

noun
1. cowhand, drover, herder, rancher, stockman, cattleman, herdsman, gaucho (S. American), buckaroo (U.S.), ranchero (U.S.), cowpuncher (U.S. informal), broncobuster (U.S.), wrangler (U.S.) Ranchers have recently been finding it impossible to recruit people to work as cowboys.
2. amateur, fraud, rogue, incompetent, bungler, nonprofessional Those builders we hired were nothing but a bunch of cowboys.
Translations
رَاعي البَقرراعي بَقَـر
kovbojhonák
cowboy
karjapaimen
kauboj
lovas marhapásztor
kúreki
カウボーイ
카우보이
govedarkavboj
cowboy
คาวบอย
cao bồi

cowboy

[ˈkaʊbɔɪ]
A. N
1.vaquero m, gaucho m (Arg) (Cine etc) → cowboy m
cowboys and Indians (= game) → indios mpl y americanos
2. (Brit) → chorizo/a m/f (Sp)
he's a real cowboyes un auténtico chorizo
the cowboys of the building tradelos piratas de la construcción
B. CPD cowboy boots NPLbotas fpl camperas
cowboy hat Nsombrero m de cowboy

cowboy

[ˈkaʊbɔɪ]
n
(= worker with cattle) → cow-boy m
(British) (= incompetent worker) → fumiste mf
modif
[film] → de cow-boy
(British) (= incompetent) [builder] → pas sérieux/eusecowboy boots nplsantiags mplcowboy hat nchapeau m de cow-boy, stetson mcowboy outfit npanoplie f de cowboycow dung nbouse f de vache

cowboy

[ˈkaʊˌbɔɪ] ncowboy m inv
to play cowboys and Indians → giocare agli indiani (e ai cowboys)

cow1

(kau) noun
1. the female of cattle used for giving milk. He has ten cows and a bull.
2. the female of certain other animals eg the elephant, whale.
ˈcowboy noun
in the United States, a man who looks after cattle on a ranch.
ˈcowherd noun
a person who looks after cows.
ˈcowhide noun, adjective
(of) the skin of a cow made into leather. a bag made of cowhide; a cowhide bag.

cowboy

رَاعي البَقر kovboj cowboy Cowboy καουμπόης vaquero karjapaimen cow-boy kauboj cowboy カウボーイ 카우보이 cowboy cowboy kowboj boiadeiro, vaqueiro ковбой cowboy คาวบอย kovboy cao bồi 牛仔
References in classic literature ?
He got out his `chaps' and silver spurs to show them to Jake and me, and his best cowboy boots, with tops stitched in bold design-- roses, and true-lover's knots, and undraped female figures.
An- other officer, riding with the skillful abandon of a cowboy, galloped his horse to a position directly before the general.
The officer who rode like a cowboy reflected for an instant.
Next, it appeared to him that Sunday afternoon, when everybody was gone to church except Jacob and the cowboy, was so singularly favourable an opportunity for sons who wanted to appropriate their mothers' guineas, that he half thought it must have been kindly intended by Providence for such purposes.
There were other striking things about her--the cowboy Stetson hat, the heavy braids of brown hair, and the long-barrelled 38 Colt's revolver that hung in its holster on her hip.
Indeed even now the ballads and ballad-making are not altogether dead, but may still be found nourishing in such outskirts of civilization as the cowboy plains of Texas, Rocky Mountain mining camps, or the nooks and corners of the Southern Alleghenies.
If you would know the flavor of huckleberries, ask the cowboy or the partridge.
Billy sang a lugubrious song of many stanzas about a cowboy, the refrain of which was, "Bury me out on the lone pr-rairie.
He was about to get down and lead his horse through the damp dirt of the hollow farmyard, shadowed drearily by the large half-timbered buildings, up to the long line of tumble-down dwelling-houses standing on a raised causeway; but the timely appearance of a cowboy saved him that frustration of a plan he had determined on,--namely, not to get down from his horse during this visit.
It was about three in the afternoon when Alisande had begun to tell me who the cowboys were; so she had made pretty good progress with it -- for her.
Commingled with them were cowboys, Red Indians, and comic, respectful niggers.
He saw cowboys at the bar, drinking fierce whiskey, the air filled with obscenity and ribald language, and he saw himself with them drinking and cursing with the wildest, or sitting at table with them, under smoking kerosene lamps, while the chips clicked and clattered and the cards were dealt around.