coxcomb


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cox·comb

 (kŏks′kōm′)
n.
1. A conceited dandy; a fop.
2. Obsolete A jester's cap; a cockscomb.

[Middle English cokkes comb, crest of a cock : cokkes, genitive of cok, cock; see cock1 + comb, crest; see comb.]

cox·comb′i·cal (-kōm′ĭ-kəl) adj.

coxcomb

(ˈkɒksˌkəʊm)
n
1. (Zoology) a variant spelling of cockscomb
2. archaic a foppish man
3. (Historical Terms) obsolete the cap, resembling a cock's comb, worn by a jester

cox•comb

(ˈkɒksˌkoʊm)

n.
1. a conceited, foolish dandy; pretentious fop.
2. Archaic. head; pate.
[1565–75; sp. variant of cockscomb]
cox•comb′i•cal (-ˈkɒm ɪ kəl, -ˈkoʊ mɪ-) cox•comb′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coxcomb - a conceited dandy who is overly impressed by his own accomplishmentscoxcomb - a conceited dandy who is overly impressed by his own accomplishments
dandy, fashion plate, fop, gallant, sheik, dude, beau, clotheshorse, swell - a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance
2.coxcomb - a cap worn by court jesters; adorned with a strip of red
cap - a tight-fitting headdress
3.coxcomb - the fleshy red crest on the head of the domestic fowl and other gallinaceous birds
crest - a showy growth of e.g. feathers or skin on the head of a bird or other animal
gallinacean, gallinaceous bird - heavy-bodied largely ground-feeding domestic or game birds
Translations

coxcomb

[ˈkɒkskəʊm] Ncresta f de gallo

coxcomb

n (old)Stutzer m (old)
References in classic literature ?
Jo knew that `young Laurence' was regarded as a most eligible parti by worldly mamas, was much smiled upon by their daughters, and flattered enough by ladies of all ages to make a coxcomb of him, so she watched him rather jealously, fearing he would be spoiled, and rejoiced more than she confessed to find that he still believed in modest girls.
There was the honest cockrobin, the favorite game of stripling sportsmen, with its loud querulous note; and the twittering blackbirds flying in sable clouds, and the golden- winged woodpecker with his crimson crest, his broad black gorget, and splendid plumage; and the cedar-bird, with its red tipt wings and yellow-tipt tail and its little monteiro cap of feathers; and the blue jay, that noisy coxcomb, in his gay light blue coat and white underclothes, screaming and chattering, nodding and bobbing and bowing, and pretending to be on good terms with every songster of the grove.
If I find him conversable, I shall be glad of his acquaintance; but if he is only a chattering coxcomb, he will not occupy much of my time or thoughts.
Not at all--I never saw him; but I fancy he is very unlike his brother--silly and a great coxcomb.
At the risk of spoiling my story and of being taken for a coxcomb, I state my intention at the outset.
Twice two makes four is a pert coxcomb who stands with arms akimbo barring your path and spitting.
She wouldn't believe me, saying that she knew Anne of Austria, who was too proud to love such a worthless coxcomb.
Why, what a foolhardy, self-conceited coxcomb he is
It will be a bitter pill to her; that is, like other bitter pills, it will have two moments' ill flavour, and then be swallowed and forgotten; for I am not such a coxcomb as to suppose her feelings more lasting than other women's, though I was the object of them.
That she meant to marry my brother, was what at that time I did not believe; for though he was assiduous in his attentions to her, and I knew well enough that both he and my father had made up their minds to this result, there was not yet an understood engagement--there had been no explicit declaration; and Bertha habitually, while she flirted with my brother, and accepted his homage in a way that implied to him a thorough recognition of its intention, made me believe, by the subtlest looks and phrases--feminine nothings which could never be quoted against her--that he was really the object of her secret ridicule; that she thought him, as I did, a coxcomb, whom she would have pleasure in disappointing.
A man who joined his regiment at twenty and within a week challenged the most imperious and presumptuous coxcomb of a commanding officer that ever drew the breath of life through a tight waist--and got broke for it--is not the man to be walked over by all the Sir Lucifers, dead or alive, locked or unlocked.
He is the greatest coxcomb I ever saw, and amazingly disagreeable.