crackers


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Related to crackers: Christmas Crackers

crack·ers

 (krăk′ərz)
adj. Chiefly British Slang
Insane; mad.

[Probably from cracker, breakdown.]

crackers

(ˈkrækəz)
adj
(postpositive) Brit a slang word for insane
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.crackers - informal or slang terms for mentally irregularcrackers - informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"

crackers

adjective
Chiefly British. Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
Translations
مَجْنون
praštěný
skørtosset
klikkaîur
padnutý na hlavu

crackers

[ˈkrækəz] ADJ (Brit) → lelo, chiflado

crackers

[ˈkrækərz] adj (= mad) to be crackers (British)être cinglé(e) crack house n [drug addicts] → crack-house f (maison où l'on vend, achète et consomme du crack)

crackers

adj pred (Brit inf) → übergeschnappt (inf); to go crackersüberschnappen (inf)

crackers

[ˈkrækəz] adj (Brit) (fam) → pazzo/a, tocco/a
he's crackers → è un po' tocco

crack

(krӕk) verb
1. to (cause to) break partly without falling to pieces. The window cracked down the middle.
2. to break (open). He cracked the peanuts between his finger and thumb.
3. to make a sudden sharp sound of breaking. The twig cracked as I stepped on it.
4. to make (a joke). He's always cracking jokes.
5. to open (a safe) by illegal means.
6. to solve (a code).
7. to give in to torture or similar pressures. The spy finally cracked under their questioning and told them everything he knew.
noun
1. a split or break. There's a crack in this cup.
2. a narrow opening. The door opened a crack.
3. a sudden sharp sound. the crack of whip.
4. a blow. a crack on the jaw.
5. a joke. He made a crack about my big feet.
6. a very addictive drug. He died of too much crack with alcohol
adjective
expert. a crack racing-driver.
cracked adjective
1. damaged by cracks. a cracked cup.
2. crazy. She must be cracked!
crackdown noun
ˈcracker noun
1. a thin crisp biscuit.
2. a small exploding firework. fire crackers.
3. a decorated paper tube, containing paper hats etc, which gives a loud crack when pulled apart.
ˈcrackers adjective
crazy. You must be crackers to believe that!
crack a book, crack a book
(slang) to open a book in order to read or study. He always gets high marks in his exams although he hardly cracks a textbook.
crack down (on)
to act firmly against. The police have cracked down on drug dealers; to crack down on illegal immigration.
get cracking
to get moving quickly.
have a crack (at)
to have a try at.
References in classic literature ?
And to the rest she added a pint of milk, two eggs, four spoons of sugar, nutmeg, and some crackers, put it in a deep dish, and baked it till it was brown and nice, and next day it was eaten by a family named March.
The man of root-beer came, in his neatly painted wagon, with a couple of dozen full bottles, to be exchanged for empty ones; the baker, with a lot of crackers which Hepzibah had ordered for her retail custom; the butcher, with a nice titbit which he fancied she would be eager to secure for Clifford.
There were sugar and salt and tea and crackers, and a can of lard and a milk pail, and a scrubbing brush, and a pair of shoes for the second oldest boy, and a can of oil, and a tack hammer, and a pound of nails.
said Miss Ophelia to herself, proceeding to tumble over the drawer, where she found a nutmeg-grater and two or three nutmegs, a Methodist hymn-book, a couple of soiled Madras handkerchiefs, some yarn and knitting-work, a paper of tobacco and a pipe, a few crackers, one or two gilded china-saucers with some pomade in them, one or two thin old shoes, a piece of flannel carefully pinned up enclosing some small white onions, several damask table-napkins, some coarse crash towels, some twine and darning-needles, and several broken papers, from which sundry sweet herbs were sifting into the drawer.
You'll find a bowl o' crackers an' milk on your bureau, an' I don't want to hear a sound from you till breakfast time.
There were crackers in it with the tenderest mottoes that could be got for money.
The duke, the duchess, and all in the garden were listening to the conversation of the two heroes, and were beyond measure amused by it; and now, desirous of putting a finishing touch to this rare and well-contrived adventure, they applied a light to Clavileno's tail with some tow, and the horse, being full of squibs and crackers, immediately blew up with a prodigious noise, and brought Don Quixote and Sancho Panza to the ground half singed.
I rushed into his room, and returned with a little tin of tiny cylinders done up like miniature crackers in scraps of calico; the spent youth broke one in his handkerchief, in which he immediately buried his face.
It was, since he could not escape from the Pope of the Fools, from Jehan Fourbault's bannerets, from May trusses, from squibs and crackers, to go to the Place de Grève.
The mutineers of the Arrow had landed a small supply of dried meats, canned soups and vegetables, crackers, flour, tea, and coffee for the five they had marooned, and these were hurriedly drawn upon to satisfy the craving of long-famished appetites.
if they were real crackers they could not be lovelier.
He had been dreaming confusedly of Edna, and desert dervishes, and of riding bicycles in an extremely perilous manner through the upper air amidst a pyrotechnic display of crackers and Bengal lights--to the great annoyance of a sort of composite person made up of the Prince and Mr.