cradle


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Related to cradle: cradle cap

cra·dle

 (krād′l)
n.
1. A small low bed for an infant, often furnished with rockers.
2.
a. The earliest period of life: had an interest in music almost from the cradle.
b. A place of origin; a birthplace: the cradle of civilization.
3.
a. A framework of wood or metal used to support something, such as a ship undergoing construction or repair.
b. A framework used to protect an injured limb.
4. A low flat framework that rolls on casters, used by a mechanic working beneath an automobile. Also called creeper.
5. The part of a telephone that contains the connecting switch upon which the receiver and mouthpiece unit is supported.
6.
a. A frame projecting above a scythe, used to catch grain as it is cut so that it can be laid flat.
b. A scythe equipped with such a frame.
7. A boxlike device furnished with rockers, used for washing gold-bearing dirt.
tr.v. cra·dled, cra·dling, cra·dles
1.
a. To place or retain in a cradle.
b. To care for or nurture in infancy.
c. To hold or support protectively: cradled the cat in his arms.
d. Sports In hockey, to keep possession of (the puck) by moving the stick back and forth to prevent the puck from sliding away.
e. Sports In lacrosse, to keep possession of (the ball) by moving the stick back and forth to prevent the ball from falling to the ground or resting too low in the webbing for easy release.
2. To reap (grain) with a cradle.
3. To place or support (a ship, for example) in a cradle.
4. To wash (gold-bearing dirt) in a cradle.

[Middle English cradel, from Old English.]

cra′dler n.

cradle

(ˈkreɪdəl)
n
1. (Furniture) a baby's bed with enclosed sides, often with a hood and rockers
2. a place where something originates or is nurtured during its early life: the cradle of civilization.
3. the earliest period of life: they knew each other from the cradle.
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a frame, rest, or trolley made to support or transport a piece of equipment, aircraft, ship, etc
5. (Mechanical Engineering) a platform, cage, or trolley, in which workmen are suspended on the side of a building or ship
6. (Telecommunications) the part of a telephone on which the handset rests when not in use
7. (Computer Science) a holder connected to a computer allowing data to be transferred from a PDA, digital camera, etc
8. (Automotive Engineering) another name for creeper5
9. (Agriculture) agriculture
a. a framework of several wooden fingers attached to a scythe to gather the grain into bunches as it is cut
b. a scythe equipped with such a cradle; cradle scythe
c. a collar of wooden fingers that prevents a horse or cow from turning its head and biting itself
10. (Mining & Quarrying) Also called: rocker a boxlike apparatus for washing rocks, sand, etc, containing gold or gem stones
11. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) engraving a tool that produces the pitted surface of a copper mezzotint plate before the design is engraved upon it
12. (Medicine) a framework used to prevent the bedclothes from touching a sensitive part of an injured person
13. from the cradle to the grave throughout life
vb
14. (tr) to rock or place in or as if in a cradle; hold tenderly
15. (tr) to nurture in or bring up from infancy
16. (Telecommunications) (tr) to replace (the handset of a telephone) on the cradle
17. (Agriculture) to reap (grain) with a cradle scythe
18. (Mining & Quarrying) (tr) to wash (soil bearing gold, etc) in a cradle
19. (Lacrosse) lacrosse to keep (the ball) in the net of the stick, esp while running with it
[Old English cradol; related to Old High German kratto basket]
ˈcradler n

cra•dle

(ˈkreɪd l)

n., v. -dled, -dling. n.
1. a small bed for an infant, usu. on rockers.
2. any of various supports for objects set horizontally, as the support for receiver of a telephone.
3. the place where something is nurtured in its early years: Boston is the cradle of the American Revolution.
4.
a. a toothed frame attached to a scythe for laying grain in bunches as it is cut.
b. a scythe together with this frame.
5. a wire or wicker basket used at table to hold a wine bottle in a slightly upturned position.
6. the part of a gun carriage on which a recoiling gun slides.
7. a frame that prevents the bedclothes from touching an injured part of a bedridden patient.
v.t.
8. to hold gently or protectively.
9. to place or rock in or as if in an infant's cradle.
10. to nurture during infancy.
11. to cut (grain) with a cradle.
v.i.
12. to lie in or as if in a cradle.
13. to cut grain with a cradle scythe.
Idioms:
rob the cradle, to become romantically involved with a person much younger than oneself.
[before 1000; Middle English cradel, Old English cradol; akin to Old High German cratto basket]
cra′dler, n.

cradle


Past participle: cradled
Gerund: cradling

Imperative
cradle
cradle
Present
I cradle
you cradle
he/she/it cradles
we cradle
you cradle
they cradle
Preterite
I cradled
you cradled
he/she/it cradled
we cradled
you cradled
they cradled
Present Continuous
I am cradling
you are cradling
he/she/it is cradling
we are cradling
you are cradling
they are cradling
Present Perfect
I have cradled
you have cradled
he/she/it has cradled
we have cradled
you have cradled
they have cradled
Past Continuous
I was cradling
you were cradling
he/she/it was cradling
we were cradling
you were cradling
they were cradling
Past Perfect
I had cradled
you had cradled
he/she/it had cradled
we had cradled
you had cradled
they had cradled
Future
I will cradle
you will cradle
he/she/it will cradle
we will cradle
you will cradle
they will cradle
Future Perfect
I will have cradled
you will have cradled
he/she/it will have cradled
we will have cradled
you will have cradled
they will have cradled
Future Continuous
I will be cradling
you will be cradling
he/she/it will be cradling
we will be cradling
you will be cradling
they will be cradling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cradling
you have been cradling
he/she/it has been cradling
we have been cradling
you have been cradling
they have been cradling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cradling
you will have been cradling
he/she/it will have been cradling
we will have been cradling
you will have been cradling
they will have been cradling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cradling
you had been cradling
he/she/it had been cradling
we had been cradling
you had been cradling
they had been cradling
Conditional
I would cradle
you would cradle
he/she/it would cradle
we would cradle
you would cradle
they would cradle
Past Conditional
I would have cradled
you would have cradled
he/she/it would have cradled
we would have cradled
you would have cradled
they would have cradled

Cradle

A term sometimes used instead of Cradle scythe. The term also was used when referring only to the wooden frame attached to a scythe to convert it into a Cradle scythe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cradle - a baby bed with sides and rockerscradle - a baby bed with sides and rockers  
baby bed, baby's bed - a small bed for babies; enclosed by sides to prevent the baby from falling
rocker - a curved support that permits the supported object to rock to and fro
2.cradle - where something originated or was nurtured in its early existence; "the birthplace of civilization"
origin, source, root, rootage, beginning - the place where something begins, where it springs into being; "the Italian beginning of the Renaissance"; "Jupiter was the origin of the radiation"; "Pittsburgh is the source of the Ohio River"; "communism's Russian root"
3.cradle - birth of a person; "he was taught from the cradle never to cry"
birth - the time when something begins (especially life); "they divorced after the birth of the child"; "his election signaled the birth of a new age"
4.cradle - a trough that can be rocked back and forth; used by gold miners to shake auriferous earth in water in order to separate the gold
trough - a long narrow shallow receptacle
Verb1.cradle - hold gently and carefully; "He cradles the child in his arms"
hold, take hold - have or hold in one's hands or grip; "Hold this bowl for a moment, please"; "A crazy idea took hold of him"
2.cradle - bring up from infancy
parent, bring up, nurture, rear, raise - bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
3.cradle - hold or place in or as if in a cradle; "He cradled the infant in his arms"
hold, take hold - have or hold in one's hands or grip; "Hold this bowl for a moment, please"; "A crazy idea took hold of him"
4.cradle - cut grain with a cradle scythe
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
5.cradle - wash in a cradle; "cradle gold"
launder, wash - cleanse with a cleaning agent, such as soap, and water; "Wash the towels, please!"
6.cradle - run with the stick
lacrosse - a game invented by American Indians; now played by two teams who use long-handled rackets to catch and carry and throw the ball toward the opponents' goal
play - participate in games or sport; "We played hockey all afternoon"; "play cards"; "Pele played for the Brazilian teams in many important matches"

cradle

noun
1. crib, cot, Moses basket, bassinet The baby sleeps in the cradle upstairs.
2. birthplace, beginning, source, spring, origin, fount, fountainhead, wellspring New York is the cradle of capitalism.
verb
1. hold, support, rock, nurse, nestle I cradled her in my arms.
Translations
حَمّالة السَّفينه، محْملسَرير طِفْلمَهْديَهُزُّ ، يُهَدهِدُ
bressol
kolébkakolébková podpěrachovat
vuggeunderstøtning
lulilo
kehtolastalavettiliekuttaapelastustuoli
zipka
bölcsőbölcsõben ringatlengõállvány
vaggabakkastokkarhalda barni á örmum sér
揺りかご
요람
lopšyspastovasstapelissuptišvelniai laikyti
aijāteliņšgrozāmas sastatnesšūpotšūpulis
zibelka
vagga
เปลเด็ก
beşikgemi kızağıözenle tutmak
nôi

cradle

[ˈkreɪdl]
A. N
1. (= cot, birthplace etc) → cuna f
from the cradle to the gravedesde que nació, nacen hasta que murió, mueren
to rob the cradlecasarse con una persona mucho más joven
2. [of telephone] → soporte m, horquilla f
3. (Constr) → andamio m volante
B. VT [+ child] → mecer, acunar; [+ object] → abrazar
to cradle a child in one's armsmecer un niño en los brazos
C. CPD cradle snatcher N she's a cradle snatchersiempre va detrás de los jovencitos

cradle

[ˈkreɪdəl]
nberceau m
from the cradle to the grave → du berceau au cercueil
vt [+ child] → bercer; (object)tenir dans ses brascradle cap ncroûtes fpl de lait

cradle

n (= cot, fig: = birthplace) → Wiege f; (= support, of phone) → Gabel f; (for invalids) → Schutzgestell nt (zum Abhalten des Bettzeugs von Verletzungen); (for ship) → (Ablauf)schlitten m; (Build, for window-cleaners) → Hängegerüst nt; (in sea rescues) → Hosenboje f; (for mechanic under car) → Schlitten m; from the cradle to the gravevon der Wiege bis zur Bahre; right from the cradlevon klein auf, von Kindesbeinen an
vt
(= hold closely)an sich (acc)drücken; he was cradling his injured armer hielt sich (dat)seinen verletzten Arm; to cradle somebody/something in one’s arms/lapjdn/etw fest in den Armen/auf dem Schoß halten; the baby lay cradled in her lapdas Baby lag (geborgen) in ihrem Schoß; he cradled the telephone under his chiner klemmte sich (dat)den Hörer unters Kinn; the way he cradles the guitarwie er die Gitarre zärtlich hält
receiverauflegen

cradle

:
cradle cap
nMilchschorf m
cradle snatcher
n (inf) what a cradle he/she is! (fig)der könnte ja ihr Vater/sie könnte ja seine Mutter sein!
cradle-snatching
n (inf) she is known for cradlesie angelt sich dauernd viel jüngere Männer (inf)
cradlesong
nWiegenlied nt

cradle

[ˈkreɪdl]
1. nculla; (of telephone) → forcella (Constr) → gabbia
2. vt (child) → tenere tra le braccia; (object) → reggere tra le braccia

cradle

(ˈkreidl) noun
1. a child's bed especially one in which it can be rocked.
2. a frame of similar shape, eg one under a ship that is being built or repaired.
verb
to hold or rock as if in a cradle. She cradled the child in her arms.

cradle

مَهْد kolébka vugge Wiege κούνια μωρού cuna kehto berceau zipka culla 揺りかご 요람 wieg vugge kołyska berço, berço de balançar колыбель vagga เปลเด็ก beşik nôi 摇篮

cra·dle

n. cuna;
___ capcostra láctea.

cradle

n cuna
References in classic literature ?
She would like the relics of great people better, for I've seen her Napoleon's cocked hat and gray coat, his baby's cradle and his old toothbrush, also Marie Antoinette's little shoe, the ring of Saint Denis, Charlemagne's sword, and many other interesting things.
A graceful cradle of willow, with all its dainty furbishings, was laid upon the pyre, which had already been fed with the richness of a priceless layette.
One day, as her mother stooped over the cradle, the infant's eyes had been caught by the glimmering of the gold embroidery about the letter; and putting up her little hand she grasped at it, smiling, not doubtfully, but with a decided gleam, that gave her face the look of a much older child.
He found favor in the eyes of the mothers by petting the children, particularly the youngest; and like the lion bold, which whilom so magnanimously the lamb did hold, he would sit with a child on one knee, and rock a cradle with his foot for whole hours together.
It is worse; for you cannot sit motionless in the heart of these perils, because the boat is rocking like a cradle, and you are pitched one way and the other, without the slightest warning; and only by a certain self-adjusting buoyancy and simultaneousness of volition and action, can you escape being made a Mazeppa of, and run away with where the all-seeing sun himself could never pierce you out.
Underneath this, in one corner, was a picture of a husband and wife in loving embrace; in the opposite corner was a cradle, with fluffy curtains drawn over it, and a smiling cherub hovering upon silver-colored wings.
When she heard the name of the place called out, she hastily laid the child down in a little cradle formed by the hollow among the boxes, first carefully spreading under it her cloak; and then she sprung to the side of the boat, in hopes that, among the various hotel-waiters who thronged the wharf, she might see her husband.
An English gentleman who had lived some years in this region, said it was the cradle of compulsory education.
That forest-dell, where Lowood lay, was the cradle of fog and fog- bred pestilence; which, quickening with the quickening spring, crept into the Orphan Asylum, breathed typhus through its crowded schoolroom and dormitory, and, ere May arrived, transformed the seminary into an hospital.
From dinner to tea she would lie in her breeze-rocked cradle, doing nothing except singing old songs - my nursery lore - to herself, or watching the birds, joint tenants, feed and entice their young ones to fly: or nestling with closed lids, half thinking, half dreaming, happier than words can express.
The Grand Difficulty of humanity from the cradle to the grave -- Money.
rejoined Miss Pross; "you were a bachelor in your cradle.