cranachan


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cranachan

(ˈkrænəxən)
n
a Scottish dessert made with oatmeal, cream, and whisky
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Dessert was Cranachan - a traditional Scottish dish, made with oats, cream, whisky and raspberries - served with toasted oat praline and whisky gel, and the Cacao Barry chocolate mousse, with minted oranges and honeycomb which cut nicely through the rich dark chocolate.
The children enjoyed a Scottish themed menu of oatcakes and fruit, haggis, neeps and tatties followed by cranachan (oatmeal, raspberries, honey and double cream) and shortbread for Burns Night celebrations.
For those curious about kilts, Ceilidhs (a dance) and cranachan (a Scottish dessert), the Caledonian Society of Lebanon are the ambassadors of the best culture from both the Highlands and Lowlands.
The dessert was chocolate pistachio Drambuie and raspberry shortbread, with Arran Dairies cranachan ice-cream.
Food match: A full bodied malt for pairing with cranachan (the Scottish dessert made from whipped cream, honey, fresh raspberries and oatmeal), it's a beautiful expression from one of the few distilleries left that was making whisky during Burns' lifetime - and should inspire a rousing rendition of Burns' classic Auld Lang Syne.
For dessert many people will delve into the traditional Scottish cook book and serve up cranachan (a mixture of whipped cream, whisky, honey and fresh raspberries, with toasted oatmeal) or Tipsy Laird (whisky trifle) followed by oatcakes and cheese.
The evening started with a glass of bubbles followed by a delicious supper of Cullen Skink, Scotch Broth, trifle, Cranachan and biscuits and cheese.
Breakfast offers all the usual suspects as well as Scottish touches such as tattie scones and haggis, and cranachan - a mix of raspberries, oats, whisky and cream, which is more properly a pudding.
At Blackfriars' Sunday Burns Night, guests will be treated to traditional cock-a-leekie soup to start, followed by haggis, neeps and tatties, before indulging in Scottish cranachan for dessert.
Fans of the long-running series are now used to foodie terms like coulis, tuile and jus, but how about Robert's "riffing on a cranachan panna cotta"?