crane


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crane

 (krān)
n.
1.
a. Any of various large wading birds of the family Gruidae, having a long neck, long legs, and a long bill.
b. A similar bird, such as a heron.
2. A machine for hoisting and moving heavy objects by means of cables attached to a movable boom.
3. Any of various devices with a swinging arm, as in a fireplace for suspending a pot.
v. craned, cran·ing, cranes
v.tr.
1. To hoist or move with or as if with a crane.
2. To strain and stretch (the neck, for example) in order to see better.
v.intr.
1. To stretch one's neck toward something for a better view.
2. To be irresolute; hesitate.

[Middle English, from Old English cran; see gerə- in Indo-European roots.]

crane

(kreɪn)
n
1. (Animals) any large long-necked long-legged wading bird of the family Gruidae, inhabiting marshes and plains in most parts of the world except South America, New Zealand, and Indonesia: order Gruiformes. See also demoiselle1, whooping crane
2. (Animals) (not in ornithological use) any similar bird, such as a heron
3. (Mechanical Engineering) a device for lifting and moving heavy objects, typically consisting of a moving boom, beam, or gantry from which lifting gear is suspended. See also gantry
4. (Film) films a large trolley carrying a boom, on the end of which is mounted a camera
vb
5. (Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to lift or move (an object) by or as if by a crane
6. to stretch out (esp the neck), as to see over other people's heads
7. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (intr) (of a horse) to pull up short before a jump
[Old English cran; related to Middle High German krane, Latin grūs, Greek géranos]

Crane

(kreɪn)
n
1. (Biography) (Harold) Hart. 1899–1932, US poet; author of The Bridge (1930)
2. (Biography) Stephen. 1871–1900, US novelist and short-story writer, noted particularly for his novel The Red Badge of Courage (1895)
3. (Biography) Walter. 1845–1915, British painter, illustrator of children's books, and designer of textiles and wallpaper

crane

(kreɪn)

n., v. craned, cran•ing. n.
1. any of various large wading birds of the family Gruidae, with long legs, bill, and neck.
2. (not used scientifically) any of various similar birds of other families, as the great blue heron.
3. a device for lifting and moving heavy weights in suspension.
4. a similar device used by a fireplace for suspending pots over the fire.
5. a vehicle having a long boom on which a television or motion-picture camera can be mounted for taking shots from high angles.
v.t.
6. to stretch (the neck) as a crane does.
v.i.
7. to stretch out one's neck, esp. to see better.
8. to hesitate at danger, difficulty, etc.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English cran, c. Middle Low German crān, Old High German krano; akin to Latin grūs, Greek géranos]

Crane

(kreɪn)

n.
1. (Harold) Hart, 1899–1932, U.S. poet.
2. Stephen, 1871–1900, U.S. novelist and short-story writer.

crane


Past participle: craned
Gerund: craning

Imperative
crane
crane
Present
I crane
you crane
he/she/it cranes
we crane
you crane
they crane
Preterite
I craned
you craned
he/she/it craned
we craned
you craned
they craned
Present Continuous
I am craning
you are craning
he/she/it is craning
we are craning
you are craning
they are craning
Present Perfect
I have craned
you have craned
he/she/it has craned
we have craned
you have craned
they have craned
Past Continuous
I was craning
you were craning
he/she/it was craning
we were craning
you were craning
they were craning
Past Perfect
I had craned
you had craned
he/she/it had craned
we had craned
you had craned
they had craned
Future
I will crane
you will crane
he/she/it will crane
we will crane
you will crane
they will crane
Future Perfect
I will have craned
you will have craned
he/she/it will have craned
we will have craned
you will have craned
they will have craned
Future Continuous
I will be craning
you will be craning
he/she/it will be craning
we will be craning
you will be craning
they will be craning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been craning
you have been craning
he/she/it has been craning
we have been craning
you have been craning
they have been craning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been craning
you will have been craning
he/she/it will have been craning
we will have been craning
you will have been craning
they will have been craning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been craning
you had been craning
he/she/it had been craning
we had been craning
you had been craning
they had been craning
Conditional
I would crane
you would crane
he/she/it would crane
we would crane
you would crane
they would crane
Past Conditional
I would have craned
you would have craned
he/she/it would have craned
we would have craned
you would have craned
they would have craned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crane - United States writer (1871-1900)Crane - United States writer (1871-1900)  
2.Crane - United States poet (1899-1932)
3.Crane - a small constellation in the southern hemisphere near Phoenix
4.crane - lifts and moves heavy objects; lifting tackle is suspended from a pivoted boom that rotates around a vertical axis
davit - a crane-like device (usually one of a pair) for suspending or lowering equipment (as a lifeboat)
derrick - a simple crane having lifting tackle slung from a boom
lifting device - a device for lifting heavy loads
transporter - a crane for moving material with dispatch as in loading and unloading ships
5.crane - large long-necked wading bird of marshes and plains in many parts of the world
wader, wading bird - any of many long-legged birds that wade in water in search of food
Grus americana, whooper, whooping crane - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting call
Verb1.crane - stretch (the neck) so as to see better; "The women craned their necks to see the President drive by"
stretch, extend - extend one's limbs or muscles, or the entire body; "Stretch your legs!"; "Extend your right arm above your head"

crane

noun
Related words
collective nouns herd, sedge, siege
Translations
رافِعَـه، مِرْفـاعغُرْنُوقوِنْشيَرْفَعُ، يَمُدُّ عُنُقَـه
jeřábnatahovat
kranstrækketrane
grúagrullaguinchegüincheestirar (el cuello)
kurkinostokurki
dizalicaždral
darukinyújtja a nyakát
kraniteygja álkuna
クレーンツル
기중기두루미
grus
gervėištiestikranaskranininkas
celtnisstaipīt
cocor
žeriav
žerjav
tranakranlyftkran
นกกระสาปั้นจั่นยกของหนัก
turnavinçuzatmak
двигунжуравелькран
cần cẩucon sếu

crane

[kreɪn]
A. N
1. (Orn) → grulla f
2. (Tech) → grúa f
B. VT
1. to crane one's neckestirar el cuello
2. (also to crane up) → levantar con grúa
C. VI (also crane forward) → inclinarse estirando el cuello
to crane to see sthestirar el cuello para ver algo
D. CPD crane driver, crane operator Noperador(a) m/f de grúa

crane

[ˈkreɪn]
n
(= machine) → grue f
(= bird) → grue f
vt
to crane one's neck → tendre le cou
vi
to crane forward → tendre le coucrane driver crane operator ngrutier/ière m/f

crane

n
Kran m; crane driverKranführer(in) m(f)
(Orn) → Kranich m
vt to crane one’s neckden Hals recken, sich (dat)fast den Hals verrenken (inf)
vi (also crane forward)den Hals or den Kopf recken

crane

[kreɪn]
1. n (Zool, Tech) → gru f inv
2. vt & vi to crane forward, to crane one's neckallungare il collo

crane

(krein) noun
a machine with a long arm and a chain, for raising heavy weights.
verb
to stretch out (the neck, to see round or over something). He craned his neck in order to see round the corner.
ˈcrane-driver noun
a person operating a crane.

crane

غُرْنُوق, وِنْش jeřáb kran, trane Kran, Kranich γερανός grúa, grulla kurki, nostokurki grue dizalica, ždral gru クレーン, ツル 기중기, 두루미 hijskraan, kraanvogel kran, trane dźwig, żuraw garça, guindaste журавль, кран lyftkran, trana นกกระสา, ปั้นจั่นยกของหนัก turna, vinç cần cẩu, con sếu 起重机,
References in classic literature ?
The cognomen of Crane was not inapplicable to his person.
But I now leave my cetological System standing thus unfinished, even as the great Cathedral of Cologne was left, with the crane still standing upon the top of the uncompleted tower.
And there with the strained craft steeply leaning over to it, by reason of the enormous downward drag from the lower mast-head, and every yard-arm on that side projecting like a crane over the waves; there, that blood-dripping head hung to the Pequod's waist like the giant Holofernes's from the girdle of Judith.
The garret, built to be a depository for firewood and the like, was dim and dark: for, the window of dormer shape, was in truth a door in the roof, with a little crane over it for the hoisting up of stores from the street: unglazed, and closing up the middle in two pieces, like any other door of French construction.
He had been hoisted into a ship at the end of a steam crane and taken for days across the water, and made to carry a mortar on his back in a strange and rocky country very far from India, and had seen the Emperor Theodore lying dead in Magdala, and had come back again in the steamer entitled, so the soldiers said, to the Abyssinian War medal.
And let no one fancy that the author was at all astray when he compared the friendship of these animals to that of men; for men have received many lessons from beasts, and learned many important things, as, for example, the clyster from the stork, vomit and gratitude from the dog, watchfulness from the crane, foresight from the ant, modesty from the elephant, and loyalty from the horse.
He saw the spiral of the descending roadway, the steep crags, the clinging bushes, the peppering of snow-wreaths, and far down in the bottom, the diminished crane.
Tis lapped by the tideless harmonies, It soars with the lonely crane.
A plan was lying open before him upon a large stone forming a table, and at some paces from him a crane was in action.
Would, then, his brethren, whom he loved, show him a Mudir's Crane whom he desired to love?
He stood there, patient and considering, with his small neat foot on a coil of rope, his back to everything that had been disembarked, his neck elongated in its polished cylinder, while the fragrance of his big cigar mingled with the odour of the rotting piles, and his little sister, beside him, hugged a huge post and tried to see how far she could crane over the water without falling in.
The latter, whose name was Leonard Crane, came straight from a crude and almost cockney office of builders and house agents in the neighboring suburb, sunning itself at the end of a new row of jerry-built houses with plans in very bright colors and notices in very large letters.