cranefly


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Related to cranefly: mosquito hawk, Tipulidae, Mosquito eater
Translations

cranefly

[ˈkreɪnflaɪ] Ntípula f

cranefly

crane fly [ˈkreɪnflaɪ] n (= daddy longlegs) → tipule f

cranefly

nSchnake f
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cranefly Orchid is the most widespread orchid found in Mississippi, but it is often overlooked because it is well camouflaged in its wooded habitat.
A Horsefly B Lacewing C Mosquito D Cranefly QUESTION 11 - for 11 points: Former Cabinet minister Peter (now Lord) Mandelson is the grandson of which other prominent Labour politician?
Selection of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae, Nematoda) for the biological control of cranefly larvae Tipula paludosa (Tipulidae, Diptera).
lutarium consumed dragonfly larvae, damselfly larvae, tadpoles, snails; however, it did not consume cranefly larvae or small fish.
Some species have already disappeared, including beetles Anthicus bimaculatus and Asaphidion pallipes, last seen in the early 1980s, the cranefly Nephrotoma quadristriata and the snail-killing fly Pherbellia grisescens last spotted in 1966.
The title of each book in the series is named for a plant that grows on Martha's Vineyard: "Deadly Nightshade," "The Cranefly Orchid Murders," "The Cemetery Yew," "Jack in the Pulpit," "The Paperwhite Narcissus" and "Indian Pipes.
The Phases of the Crow Gathering Moon and the Spinning Cranefly Moon
Label data record a male feeding on a cranefly (prey item not preserved) and on another species of Synolcus (dubius) (prey item labelled and pinned separately).
From top left, deer on Brownsea Island, Dorset, a close-up of Primula Vulgarus in bloom, a purple blossom in May, mistletoe, hawthorn berries; a male blackbird, a common pipistrelle bat, a frog, a emperor butterfly, a seal sitting on a beach at Blakeney Point, hawthorn cranefly and blackberries growing at Calke Abbey, Derbyshire
Conwy birdwatchers have been amazed to discover the largest flock ever recorded in Britain, with more than 80 birds feeding on leatherjackets, as cranefly larvae are commonly known.
The larvae of cranefly (daddy long legs), they're active through to the first frosts and love nothing better than munching roots, particularly of the grass variety.
WE all recognise Cranefly adults when they appear in our gardens and houses in late summer, but once this annoying phase has vanished and we have put the rolled up newspaper away, we tend to forget them.