crankish

crankish

(ˈkræŋkɪʃ)
adj
1. mildly eccentric
2. US mildly bad-tempered
References in periodicals archive ?
Russia Insider, an English language publication with a crankish history of publishing nonsense and propaganda, published the manifesto, which contained a comprehensive litany of the most vile accusations against Jews dating back more than one hundred years.
owned by an association of local banks, issuing a new national currency backed by gold--most of the functions of a central bank without looking like one, to appease Americans' crankish fears of banks and government domination.
I have also become somewhat crankish regarding what our students learn from us about constitutions in the United States.
I don't think it can be anything other than wonderful" Gurkhas' champion actress Joanna Lumley, as she received a hero's welcome in Nepal "I am not noted as a natural optimist" Chancellor Alistair Darling "Bacon that really smelled like a wet dog, nursery puddings of the most appalling kind, and the worst of the lot was the school trifle" Food writer and broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, recalls the food during his time at Eton "It is no longer reasonable to think Ukip or the Greens are merely crankish parties, bound to fade away" Cross-bench peer Lord Rees-Mogg "Every year they ask me to do that programme, but I just can't do it and never will.
In heedless pursuit of this agenda, what was once a crusade for tolerance has itself degenerated into a major source of crankish intolerance.
She'd often find herself at loggerheads with crankish Jack Warner, who'd demand that she play in bombs like Stallion Road (which former President Ronald Reagan did).
Liebknecht, a crankish professor of mathematics in Germany, declared the star to be a moving planet.
medieval world of Freud, with its crankish quest for sexual symbols
This theme of culture as an alien transplant has been a continuing leitmotif in much of Clarke's other fiction as well; while his speculative non-fiction has often revealed a regrettable lack of critical discipline to his imagination: he has even suggested, for example, that religion began with hallucinations brought on by malnutrition - a theory of religious origins hardly less crankish than those of von Daniken himself.
Adorno's once crankish position that Wagner's work was the decisive element linking the 19th-century rebirth of German Romanticism to the development of National Socialism now approximates something akin to received wisdom.
But history has confined his opinion of Delacroix's color to the minority--to, perhaps, even the crankish.
The first carriers of the language-plague are Jewish children, who may also be the source of a cure that is being eagerly sought after by a tribe of crankish pseudo-scientists who are all named LeBov and work out of a compound in Rochester, N.