crankpin

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Related to crankpins: Big end

crank·pin

also crank pin  (krăngk′pĭn′)
n.
A bar or cylinder in the arm of a crank to which a reciprocating member or connecting rod is attached.

crankpin

(ˈkræŋkˌpɪn)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a short cylindrical bearing surface fitted between two arms of a crank and set parallel to the main shaft of the crankshaft

crank′pin`

or crank′ pin`,



n.
a short cylindrical pin at the outer end of a crank, held by and moving with a connecting rod or link.
Compare web (def. 11).
[1830–40]
Translations

crankpin

[ˈkræŋkˌpɪn] n (Aut) → perno di biella
References in periodicals archive ?
Most profiles of crankpins are similar to ellipse in geometry [7,8], and roundness tolerance in shape of an ellipse is studied in this work to investigate the effects of roundness tolerance on bearing lubrication.
As the crankshaft is constrained by the dimension and assembly of connecting rod, frame, and other parts, the dimension of crank journals, crankpins, and bore spacing cannot be changed in this calculation example.
A combination of a 76A angle between the two banks of cylinders and a crankshaft with 28A phasing between the crankpins virtually eliminates vibration.
And the crankpins are staggered 70 degrees apart, giving firing intervals that produce what Ducati calls a Twin Pulse firing order.
Constructively they are made of main journals and crankpins and connecting them cheeks, located in different spatial positions.
Orbital grinding of crankpins on large diesel crankshafts while recognizing that the concentric main bearing journals of these parts have typically been ground on single-wheel, in-line cylindrical grinders was initially proposed.
Cinetic Landis engineers initially proposed orbital grinding of crankpins on large diesel crankshafts while recognizing that the concentric main bearing journals of these parts have typically been ground on single-wheel, inline cylindrical grinders.
It features a chamfered small end eye and, as in many racing engines, to reduce friction the con-rod is axially restrained by the piston instead of the crankpins.
Shellac bond: It's an organic bond used for grinding wheels that produce very smooth finishes on parts such as rolls, cutlery, camshafts and crankpins.
The W-8's crankpins are offset 180 degrees -- the "flat crank" design, known for its distinctive exhaust note that's now used on some Formula One racecar and Grand Prix motorcycle engines.
Crankpins were done on stand-alone Landis grinders that index to grind all crankpin surfaces in one setup.
Each stage had an independent cylinder, piston, vane, and crankpin that was part of the crankshaft and engaged with the piston.