cravat


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cra·vat

 (krə-văt′)
n.
A scarf or band of fabric worn around the neck as a tie.

[French cravate, necktie worn by Croatian mercenaries in the service of France, from Cravate, a Croatian, from German dialectal Krabate, from Serbo-Croatian Hrvāt.]

cravat

or

cravate

n
(Clothing & Fashion) a scarf of silk or fine wool, worn round the neck, esp by men
[C17: from French cravate, from Serbo-Croat Hrvat Croat; so called because worn by Croats in the French army during the Thirty Years' War]

cra•vat

(krəˈvæt)

n.
2. a scarf worn about the neck and usu. folded at the front with the ends tucked into the neckline.
[1650–60; < French cravate neckcloth, literally, Croat (< German Krabate < Serbo-Croatian hr̀vāt)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cravat - neckwear worn in a slipknot with long ends overlapping vertically in frontcravat - neckwear worn in a slipknot with long ends overlapping vertically in front
ascot - a cravat with wide square ends; secured with an ornamental pin
neckcloth, stock - an ornamental white cravat
neckwear - articles of clothing worn about the neck
Translations
رَبْطَـة عُنـق
nákrčník
halstørklædekravat
kravátli
hálsklútur
kaklaskarėpakaklinis
kravate
nákrčník

cravat

cravate [krəˈvæt] Npañuelo m

cravat

[krəˈvæt] nfoulard m (d'homme)

cravat(te)

nHalstuch nt

cravat

[krəˈvæt] n (for men) → foulard m inv da collo

cravat

(krəˈvӕt) noun
a kind of scarf worn instead of a tie round the neck.
References in classic literature ?
Arobin had put on his coat, and he stood before her and asked if his cravat was plumb.
But it was of funereal black cloth, and although relieved at one extremity by a pair of high riding boots, in which his too short trousers were tucked, and at the other by a tall white hat, and cravat of aggressive yellow, the effect was depressing.
To be sure, you have found some way of copying the portrait without its black velvet cap and gray beard, and have given him a modern coat and satin cravat, instead of his cloak and band.
This superintendent was a slim creature of thirty-five, with a sandy goatee and short sandy hair; he wore a stiff standing-collar whose upper edge almost reached his ears and whose sharp points curved forward abreast the corners of his mouth -- a fence that compelled a straight lookout ahead, and a turning of the whole body when a side view was required; his chin was propped on a spreading cravat which was as broad and as long as a bank-note, and had fringed ends; his boot toes were turned sharply up, in the fashion of the day, like sleigh- runners -- an effect patiently and laboriously produced by the young men by sitting with their toes pressed against a wall for hours together.
You're upset, Thomas, I can see -- your eyes are as red as a ferret's, and your cravat looks as if you had slept in it.
As he passed along towards Saint Antoine, he stopped at a shop-window where there was a mirror, and slightly altered the disordered arrangement of his loose cravat, and his coat- collar, and his wild hair.
He looked like a young clergyman, in his white cravat, but he was very affable and good-humoured; and he showed me my place, and presented me to the masters, in a gentlemanly way that would have put me at my ease, if anything could.
One black ox, with a white cravat on - who even had to my awakened conscience something of a clerical air - fixed me so obstinately with his eyes, and moved his blunt head round in such an accusatory manner as I moved round, that I blubbered out to him, "I couldn't help it, sir
He was not in the least lofty or aristocratic, but simply a merry-eyed, small-featured, grey-haired man, with his chin propped by an ample, many-creased white neckcloth which seemed to predominate over every other point in his person, and somehow to impress its peculiar character on his remarks; so that to have considered his amenities apart from his cravat would have been a severe, and perhaps a dangerous, effort of abstraction.
He was always seen in a maroon-colored coat with gilt buttons, half-tight breeches of poult-de-soie with gold buckles, a white waistcoat without embroidery, and a tight cravat showing no shirt-collar,--a last vestige of the old French costume which he did not renounce, perhaps, because it enabled him to show a neck like that of the sleekest abbe.
I put the shoes first advisedly, for they made an even deeper impression upon me than a seedy black coat, a pair of threadbare trousers, a flabby cravat, or a crumpled shirt collar.
This personage, who had taken the train at Elko, was tall and dark, with black moustache, black stockings, a black silk hat, a black waistcoat, black trousers, a white cravat, and dogskin gloves.