creaking


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

creak

 (krēk)
intr.v. creaked, creak·ing, creaks
1. To make a grating or squeaking sound.
2. To move with a creaking sound.
n.
A grating or squeaking sound.

[Middle English creken, croak, complain, of imitative origin.]

creak′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creaking - a squeaking sound; "the creak of the floorboards gave him away"
noise - sound of any kind (especially unintelligible or dissonant sound); "he enjoyed the street noises"; "they heard indistinct noises of people talking"; "during the firework display that ended the gala the noise reached 98 decibels"
References in classic literature ?
Through the narrow opening, a creaking of the broad wooden stairs of the old house became audible.
Poor Mrs Quilp was thinking, however, in what manner to begin or what kind of inquiries she could make; and it was not until the door, creaking in a very urgent manner, warned her to proceed without further consideration, that the sound of her voice was heard.
Moving on, I at last came to a dim sort of light not far from the docks, and heard a forlorn creaking in the air; and looking up, saw a swinging sign over the door with a white painting upon it, faintly representing a tall straight jet of misty spray, and these words underneath -- The Spouter-Inn: --Peter Coffin.
I know he had on new boots; I have heard them creaking in grandmama's room.
Edmond heard the creaking of the bed as they moved the corpse, heard the voice of the governor, who asked them to throw water on the dead man's face; and seeing that, in spite of this application, the prisoner did not recover, they sent for the doctor.
In ten minutes' time the note is written, and the boots of Papa are creaking themselves away in the passage outside.
As I asked myself these questions his match flared in the hall; in another moment the stairs were creaking under his feet, even as they had creaked under those of the murderer; and the humane instinct that inspired him in defiance of his risk was borne in also upon my slower sensibilities.
Jaggers never laughed; but he wore great bright creaking boots, and, in poising himself on these boots, with his large head bent down and his eyebrows joined together, awaiting an answer, he sometimes caused the boots to creak, as if they laughed in a dry and suspicious way.
Night now closed in more completely, and many lights began to flit through the wood, just as those fiery exhalations from the earth, that look like shooting-stars to our eyes, flit through the heavens; a frightful noise, too, was heard, like that made by the solid wheels the ox-carts usually have, by the harsh, ceaseless creaking of which, they say, the bears and wolves are put to flight, if there happen to be any where they are passing.
The reason was that I had become mercifully engrossed in one of the subsidiary problems: whether it would be better to drop from the window or to trust to the creaking stairs.
She listened intently, but she heard nothing but the creaking of his chair.
On the twelfth day my throat was so painful that, taking the chance of alarming the Martians, I attacked the creaking rain-water pump that stood by the sink, and got a couple of glassfuls of blackened and tainted rain water.