credentialism


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cre·den·tial·ism

 (krĭ-dĕn′shə-lĭz′əm)
n.
Overemphasis on diplomas or degrees in giving jobs or conferring social status.

credentialism

(krɪˈdɛnʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
often derogatory a tendency to value formal qualifications, esp at the expense of competence and experience
References in periodicals archive ?
Arrow 1973; Spence 1974) or credentialism processes (Collins 1979) rather than reflect increased job demands for higher levels of skill (Handel 2011; Quintini 2011).
First, there is the impact of credentialism laced with what we call " advocacy malpractice" around here.
Over-Education, Under-Education and Credentialism in the Australian Labour Market.
This credentialism can be implemented both directly and indirectly.
Dockery and Miller (2012) provide some evidence that there is some credentialism through comparing qualification levels of different generations within occupations, with those individuals having more than 'required' levels of education obtaining a somewhat lower return to their qualifications, relative to those individuals who find a job for which they have the 'required' education.
They perceived value in the credentialism associated with sitting for the numerous South Kensington-linked drawing examinations that Gill implemented.
As a result, these groups push credentialism, for which more credentials equals greater public good.
The army needs to grow out of its addiction to credentialism, the mindset it spawns, and the inflexibility it creates.
One member of the Brain Trust, Ray Moley, described the myopic credentialism of his fellow Brain Truster, Frankfurter, in this way: "The problems of economic life were to Frankfurter matters to be settled in a law office, a court room, or around a big labor-management bargaining table.
Like many high schools across the nation Danvers High School upheld the achievement ideology, which is closely tied with credentialism.
Creola Johnson, Credentialism and the Proliferation of Fake Degrees: The Employer Pretends to Need a Degree; the Employee Pretends to Have One, 23 HOFSTRA LAB.
Davies & Kirkpatrick (in Kirkpatrick & Lucio, 1995), in reference to higher education in Britain, noted how the sector was 'characterized by a mixture of bureaucratic and professional controls'; key elements of the latter were 'self-regulation, collegiality, credentialism and semi autonomy' which served to create an 'aura of indeterminacy precluding managerial or user involvement' (1995:92, emphasis added).