creditable


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cred·it·a·ble

 (krĕd′ĭ-tə-bəl)
adj.
1. Deserving of often limited praise or commendation: The student made a creditable effort on the essay.
2. Worthy of belief: a creditable story.
3. Deserving of commercial credit; creditworthy: a creditable customer.
4. Capable of being assigned.

cred′it·a·bil′i·ty, cred′it·a·ble·ness n.
cred′it·a·bly adv.

creditable

(ˈkrɛdɪtəbəl)
adj
1. deserving credit, honour, etc; praiseworthy
2. obsolete credible
ˈcreditableness, ˌcreditaˈbility n
ˈcreditably adv

cred•it•a•ble

(ˈkrɛd ɪ tə bəl)

adj.
bringing or deserving credit, honor, or esteem.
[1520–30]
cred′it•a•ble•ness, cred`it•a•bil′i•ty, n.
cred′it•a•bly, adv.

credible

credulouscreditable
1. 'credible'

If something is credible, it can be believed.

His latest statements are hardly credible.
This is not credible to anyone who has studied the facts.

Credible is most commonly used in negative sentences.

2. 'credulous'

People who are credulous are always ready to believe what other people tell them, and are easily deceived.

Credulous women bought the mandrake root to promote conception.
3. 'creditable'

A performance, achievement, or action that is creditable is of a reasonably high standard.

He polled a creditable 44.8 percent.
Their performance was even less creditable.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.creditable - worthy of often limited commendation; "the student's effort on the essay--though not outstanding--was creditable"
worthy - having worth or merit or value; being honorable or admirable; "a worthy fellow"; "a worthy cause"

creditable

adjective praiseworthy, worthy, respectable, admirable, honourable, exemplary, reputable, commendable, laudable, meritorious, estimable The band turned out quite a creditable performance.

creditable

adjective
2. Worthy of being believed:
Translations
جَدير بالتَّقدير، مَشْكور، حَميد
úctyhodný
hæderlig
til vegsauka
övgüye değer

creditable

[ˈkredɪtəbl] ADJloable, encomiable

creditable

[ˈkrɛdɪtəbəl] adj
[score, achievement] → honorable
[action] → honorable, estimable

creditable

adj
(= praiseworthy)lobenswert, anerkennenswert
(= credible)glaublich

creditable

[ˈkrɛdɪtəbl] adjche fa onore, lodevole, degno/a di lode

credit

(ˈkredit) noun
1. time allowed for payment of goods etc after they have been received. We don't give credit at this shop.
2. money loaned (by a bank).
3. trustworthiness regarding ability to pay for goods etc. Your credit is good.
4. (an entry on) the side of an account on which payments received are entered. Our credits are greater than our debits.
5. the sum of money which someone has in an account at a bank. Your credit amounts to 2,014 dollars.
6. belief or trust. This theory is gaining credit.
7. (American) a certificate to show that a student has completed a course which counts towards his degree.
verb
1. to enter (a sum of money) on the credit side (of an account). This cheque was credited to your account last month.
2. (with with) to think of (a person or thing) as having. He was credited with magical powers.
3. to believe (something) to be possible. Well, would you credit that!
ˈcreditable adjective
bringing honour or respect. creditable effort.
ˈcreditably adverb
ˈcreditor noun
a person to whom a debt is owed.
ˈcredits noun plural
the list of names of the actors, producer, director etc given at the beginning or end of a film.
credit card
a card which allows the holder to buy goods etc on credit. to pay by credit card.
be a credit to (someone), do (someone) credit
to bring honour or respect to (someone or something). Your son is a credit to his school; Your honesty does you credit.
give (someone) credit (for something)
to acknowledge and praise (someone for a good piece of work etc). He was given credit for completing the work so quickly.
on credit
payment being made after the date of sale. Do you sell goods on credit?
take (the) credit (for something)
to accept the praise given (for something). I did all the work, and he took all the credit.
References in classic literature ?
He had come to purchase a wedding gift for his daughter, Janet, and an outfit for himself in which he might make a creditable appearance at her marriage.
or was it a pretty severe throbbing and kicking of the heart, rather creditable to him than otherwise, as showing that the organ had not been left out of the Judge's physical contrivance?
All that is original in us, and therefore fairly creditable or dis- creditable to us, can be covered up and hidden by the point of a cambric needle, all the rest being atoms contributed by, and inherited from, a procession of ancestors that stretches back a billion years to the Adam-clam or grasshopper or monkey from whom our race has been so tediously and ostentatiously and un- profitably developed.
Now and then, as happens at all receptions everywhere, a more than ordinary friendly soul blocked the procession and kept it waiting while he inquired how the brothers liked the village, and how long they were going to stay, and if their family was well, and dragged in the weather, and hoped it would get cooler soon, and all that sort of thing, so as to be able to say, when he got home, "I had quite a long talk with them"; but nobody did or said anything of a regrettable kind, and so the great affair went through to the end in a creditable and satisfactory fashion.
It is, therefore, entirely his own produc- tion; and, considering how long and dark was the ca- reer he had to run as a slave,--how few have been his opportunities to improve his mind since he broke his iron fetters,--it is, in my judgment, highly creditable to his head and heart.
A degree or two lower, and a creditable appearance might interest me; I might hope to be useful to their families in some way or other.
He had left the girl whose youth and innocence he had seduced, in a situation of the utmost distress, with no creditable home, no help, no friends, ignorant of his address
I think I observed, myself, that it was highly creditable to all concerned.
He was now, I gathered, living partly on his pension, and spoke of this daughter married, this daughter in service here, and that daughter in service there, one son settled in London and another in the States, with something of a patriarchal pride, with the independent air too of a man who could honestly say to himself that, with few advantages from fortune, having had, so to say, to work his passage, every foot and hour of it, across those twenty-two thousand miles and those sixty-seven years, he had made a thoroughly creditable job of his life.
It may be fun to you," said Miss Lindsay sharply; "but it is not very creditable to me, as Miss Wilson said just now, to take a prize in moral science and then have to write down that I don't know how to behave myself.
My second brother is in Peru, so wealthy that with what he has sent to my father and to me he has fully repaid the portion he took with him, and has even furnished my father's hands with the means of gratifying his natural generosity, while I too have been enabled to pursue my studies in a more becoming and creditable fashion, and so to attain my present standing.
I must admit that he was a magnificent swordsman, and had it not been for my greater endurance and the remarkable agility the lesser gravitation of Mars lent me I might not have been able to put up the creditable fight I did against him.