credited


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cred·it

 (krĕd′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. An arrangement for deferred payment of a loan or purchase: a store that offers credit; bought my stereo on credit.
b. The terms governing such an arrangement: low prices and easy credit.
c. The time allowed for deferred payment: an automatic 30-day credit on all orders.
2.
a. The deduction of a payment made by a debtor from an amount due.
b. The positive balance or amount remaining in a person's account.
c. A credit line.
3. Reputation for solvency and integrity entitling a person to be trusted in buying or borrowing: You should have no trouble getting the loan if your credit is good.
4.
a. Official certification or recognition that a student has successfully completed a course of study: He received full credit for his studies at a previous school.
b. A unit of study so certified: This course carries three credits.
5. often credits An acknowledgment of work done, as in the production of a motion picture or publication: At the end of the film we stayed to watch the credits.
6. Influence based on the good opinion or confidence of others: used his credit with the police to get them to devote more time to the case.
7. Recognition or approval for an act, ability, or quality: gave them credit for a job well done.
8. A source of honor or distinction: This exceptional athlete is a credit to our team.
9. A reputation for sound character or quality; standing: It is to their credit that they worked so hard without complaining.
10. Belief or confidence in the truth of something: "They give no credit to [his] scurrilous assertions" (John Edgar Wideman). See Synonyms at belief.
tr.v. cred·it·ed, cred·it·ing, cred·its
1.
a. To give as a credit: credited $500 to her account.
b. To give a credit to: credit an account.
2. To give or award an educational credit to.
3.
a. To regard as having performed an action or being endowed with a quality: had to credit them with good intentions.
b. To ascribe or attribute: credit the invention to him; credited her recovery to an innovative treatment. See Synonyms at attribute.
4. Archaic To bring honor or distinction to.

[French, from Old French, from Old Italian credito, from Latin crēditum, loan, from neuter past participle of crēdere, to entrust; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.credited - (usually followed by `to') given credit for; "an invention credited to Edison"
attributable - capable of being attributed; "the collapse of the movement was attributable to a lack of morale"; "an idea attributable to a Russian"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
To look at the tawny brawn of his lithe snaky limbs, you would almost have credited the superstitions of some of the earlier Puritans, and half believed this wild Indian to be a son of the Prince of the Powers of the Air.
As soon as the birth agony was over, and the wounds of society had been healed, there would be established a simple system whereby each man was credited with his labor and debited with his purchases; and after that the processes of production, exchange, and consumption would go on automatically, and without our being conscious of them, any more than a man is conscious of the beating of his heart.
But both were, in those ignorant and superstitions times, easily credited as proofs of guilt.
That this breed of STRULDBRUGS was peculiar to their country, for there were no such people either in Balnibarbi or Japan, where he had the honour to be ambassador from his majesty, and found the natives in both those kingdoms very hard to believe that the fact was possible: and it appeared from my astonishment when he first mentioned the matter to me, that I received it as a thing wholly new, and scarcely to be credited.
If the gossips are to be credited, Count Philippe has sworn that, for the first time on record, the Chagnys shall not keep their promise.
As they have cloven feet, they sometimes strike up the stones when they run, which gave occasion to the notion that they threw stones at the hunters, a relation equally to be credited with those of their eating fire and digesting iron.