credits


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cred·it

 (krĕd′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. An arrangement for deferred payment of a loan or purchase: a store that offers credit; bought my stereo on credit.
b. The terms governing such an arrangement: low prices and easy credit.
c. The time allowed for deferred payment: an automatic 30-day credit on all orders.
2.
a. The deduction of a payment made by a debtor from an amount due.
b. The positive balance or amount remaining in a person's account.
c. A credit line.
3. Reputation for solvency and integrity entitling a person to be trusted in buying or borrowing: You should have no trouble getting the loan if your credit is good.
4.
a. Official certification or recognition that a student has successfully completed a course of study: He received full credit for his studies at a previous school.
b. A unit of study so certified: This course carries three credits.
5. often credits An acknowledgment of work done, as in the production of a motion picture or publication: At the end of the film we stayed to watch the credits.
6. Influence based on the good opinion or confidence of others: used his credit with the police to get them to devote more time to the case.
7. Recognition or approval for an act, ability, or quality: gave them credit for a job well done.
8. A source of honor or distinction: This exceptional athlete is a credit to our team.
9. A reputation for sound character or quality; standing: It is to their credit that they worked so hard without complaining.
10. Belief or confidence in the truth of something: "They give no credit to [his] scurrilous assertions" (John Edgar Wideman). See Synonyms at belief.
tr.v. cred·it·ed, cred·it·ing, cred·its
1.
a. To give as a credit: credited $500 to her account.
b. To give a credit to: credit an account.
2. To give or award an educational credit to.
3.
a. To regard as having performed an action or being endowed with a quality: had to credit them with good intentions.
b. To ascribe or attribute: credit the invention to him; credited her recovery to an innovative treatment. See Synonyms at attribute.
4. Archaic To bring honor or distinction to.

[French, from Old French, from Old Italian credito, from Latin crēditum, loan, from neuter past participle of crēdere, to entrust; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

credits

(ˈkrɛdɪts)
pl n
1. (Film) a list of those responsible for the production of a film or television programme
2. (Broadcasting) a list of those responsible for the production of a film or television programme
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.credits - a list of acknowledgements of those who contributed to the creation of a film (usually run at the end of the film)
list, listing - a database containing an ordered array of items (names or topics)
motion picture, motion-picture show, movie, moving picture, moving-picture show, pic, film, picture show, flick, picture - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"
acknowledgement, acknowledgment - a statement acknowledging something or someone; "she must have seen him but she gave no sign of acknowledgment"; "the preface contained an acknowledgment of those who had helped her"
Translations
قائمة بأسْماء المُمَثِّلين
titulky
liste over medvirkenderulletekst
titulky

credits

[ˈkrɛdɪts] npl (Cine, TV) (opening) → titoli mpl di testa; (closing) → titoli mpl di coda

credit

(ˈkredit) noun
1. time allowed for payment of goods etc after they have been received. We don't give credit at this shop.
2. money loaned (by a bank).
3. trustworthiness regarding ability to pay for goods etc. Your credit is good.
4. (an entry on) the side of an account on which payments received are entered. Our credits are greater than our debits.
5. the sum of money which someone has in an account at a bank. Your credit amounts to 2,014 dollars.
6. belief or trust. This theory is gaining credit.
7. (American) a certificate to show that a student has completed a course which counts towards his degree.
verb
1. to enter (a sum of money) on the credit side (of an account). This cheque was credited to your account last month.
2. (with with) to think of (a person or thing) as having. He was credited with magical powers.
3. to believe (something) to be possible. Well, would you credit that!
ˈcreditable adjective
bringing honour or respect. creditable effort.
ˈcreditably adverb
ˈcreditor noun
a person to whom a debt is owed.
ˈcredits noun plural
the list of names of the actors, producer, director etc given at the beginning or end of a film.
credit card
a card which allows the holder to buy goods etc on credit. to pay by credit card.
be a credit to (someone), do (someone) credit
to bring honour or respect to (someone or something). Your son is a credit to his school; Your honesty does you credit.
give (someone) credit (for something)
to acknowledge and praise (someone for a good piece of work etc). He was given credit for completing the work so quickly.
on credit
payment being made after the date of sale. Do you sell goods on credit?
take (the) credit (for something)
to accept the praise given (for something). I did all the work, and he took all the credit.
References in classic literature ?
Grandfather said Frances Harling was as good a judge of credits as any banker in the county.
The telegraph was set in motion; and the correspondent of the bank in Edinburgh, for which place it was understood that John had armed himself with extensive credits, was warned to communicate with the police.
One story credits my unfortunate ancestor with having had the Spaniard cut in two; and that will fit the pretty picture also.
I assure you I did not mean to reckon up debits and credits," he began, "and if you--"
There are people one credits even with that," he replied a little vaguely.
Beginning with the crash of several of the greatest Eastern banking houses, the tightness spread, until every bank in the country was calling in its credits.
The guard treated him unfairly, lied about him to the warden, lost his credits, persecuted him.
The banks, themselves constituting one of the most important forces of the Oligarchy, continued to call in credits.
The documents too from which the doctrine is to be drawn, charmed my fancy by their endless variety, and lay always before me, even in sleep; for they are the tools in our hands, the bread in our basket, the transactions of the street, the farm and the dwelling-house; greetings, relations, debts and credits, the influence of character, the nature and endowment of all men.
As for the money I had from you, I deposit it to your credit, Professor Beecher having made me an allowance for steering rival parties on the wrong trail.
I said these words did him extreme credit, but that he must not throw away the imperishable distinction of being the first man to descend an Alp per parachute, simply to save the feelings of some envious underlings.
Considering the man as an intruder on their business, whose success might deprive them of the credit and reward of making the discovery, they took advantage of their superiority in numbers, and of their being first in the field, and carefully misled the stranger before they ventured any further with their own investigations.