creed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

creed

 (krēd)
n.
1. A formal statement of religious belief; a confession of faith.
2. A system of belief, principles, or opinions: laws banning discrimination on the basis of race or creed; an architectural creed that demanded simple lines.

[Middle English crede, from Old English crēda, from Latin crēdō, I believe; see credo.]

creed

(kriːd)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a concise, formal statement of the essential articles of Christian belief, such as the Apostles' Creed or the Nicene Creed
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any statement or system of beliefs or principles
[Old English crēda, from Latin crēdo I believe]
ˈcreedal, ˈcredal adj

Creed

(kriːd)
n
(Biography) Frederick. 1871–1957, Canadian inventor, resident in Scotland from 1897, noted for his invention of the teleprinter, first used in 1912

creed

(krid)

n.
1. an authoritative formulated statement of the chief articles of Christian belief.
2. an accepted system of religious or other belief.
[before 1000; Middle English crede, Old English crēda < Latin crēdō I believe; see credo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creed - any system of principles or beliefscreed - any system of principles or beliefs
testament - a profession of belief; "he stated his political testament"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Athanasian Creed - a Christian profession of faith
2.creed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that groupcreed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
original sin - a sin said to be inherited by all descendants of Adam; "Adam and Eve committed the original sin when they ate the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
confession - the document that spells out the belief system of a given church (especially the Reformation churches of the 16th century)
ahimsa - a Buddhist and Hindu and especially Jainist doctrine holding that all forms of life are sacred and urging the avoidance of violence
dogma, tenet - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
ecumenicalism, ecumenicism, ecumenism - (Christianity) the doctrine of the ecumenical movement that promotes cooperation and better understanding among different religious denominations: aimed at universal Christian unity
Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, Immaculate Conception - (Christianity) the Roman Catholic dogma that God preserved the Virgin Mary from any stain of original sin from the moment she was conceived
Incarnation - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine of the union of God and man in the person of Jesus Christ
Nicene Creed - (Christianity) a formal creed summarizing Christian beliefs; first adopted in 325 and later expanded
real presence - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine that the body of Christ is actually present in the Eucharist

creed

noun belief, principles, profession (of faith), doctrine, canon, persuasion, dogma, tenet, credo, catechism, articles of faith The centre is open to all, no matter what race or creed.

creed

noun
A system of religious belief:
Translations
عَقيدَه، مَذْهَب
krédovíravyznánívyznání víry
livsopfattelseoverbevisningtro
oppiusko
crédofoicredo
apostoli hitvalláshitvallás
trúarjátning
pažiūros
kredopārliecībaticība
vyznanie viery
dinsel inançlaritikat

creed

[kriːd] N (= religion) → credo m, religión f; (= system of beliefs) → credo m
the Creed (Rel) → el Credo

Creed

[ˈkriːd] n
the Creed (in Mass)le Credo

creed

[ˈkriːd] n
(= religious belief) → croyance f
(= principles) → philosophie f

creed

n (Eccl: = prayer) → Glaubensbekenntnis nt; (as part of service, fig also) → Kredo nt, → Credo nt

creed

[kriːd] ncredo, dottrina

creed

(kriːd) noun
(a short statement of) one's (especially religious) beliefs.
References in classic literature ?
But when they spoke of the future prospects of Cora and Uncas, he shook his head, like one who knew the error of their simple creed, and resuming his reclining attitude, he maintained it until the ceremony, if that might be called a ceremony, in which feeling was so deeply imbued, was finished.
This creed was never taught, for instance, by the venerable pastor, John Wilson, whose beard, white as a snow-drift, was seen over Governor Bellingham's shoulders, while its wearer suggested that pears and peaches might yet be naturalised in the New England climate, and that purple grapes might possibly be compelled to flourish against the sunny garden-wall.
It must be so; yes, it's part of his creed, I suppose; well, then, let him rest; he'll get up sooner or later, no doubt.
ReMember, the proceeds go to a great and free charity, and one whose broad begevolence stretches out its help- ing hand, warm with the blood of a lov- ing heart, to all that suffer, regardless of race, creed, condition or color--the only charity yet established in the earth which has no politico-religious stop- cock on its compassion, but says Here flows the stream, let ALL come and drink
Those green boughs, the hymn and anthem never heard but at Christmas-- even the Athanasian Creed, which was discriminated from the others only as being longer and of exceptional virtue, since it was only read on rare occasions--brought a vague exulting sense, for which the grown men could as little have found words as the children, that something great and mysterious had been done for them in heaven above and in earth below, which they were appropriating by their presence.
And may it please your gracious Reverence,'' said the man, ``I cannot think the damsel meant harm by me, though she hath the ill hap to be a Jewess; for even when I used her remedy, I said the Pater and the Creed, and it never operated a whit less kindly ''
But he never fell into the error of arresting his intellectual development by any formal acceptance of creed or system, or of mistaking, for a house in which to live, an inn that is but suitable for the sojourn of a night, or for a few hours of a night in which there are no stars and the moon is in travail.
Lothario then went on to say, "It seems to me, Anselmo, that thine is just now the temper of mind which is always that of the Moors, who can never be brought to see the error of their creed by quotations from the Holy Scriptures, or by reasons which depend upon the examination of the understanding or are founded upon the articles of faith, but must have examples that are palpable, easy, intelligible, capable of proof, not admitting of doubt, with mathematical demonstrations that cannot be denied, like, 'If equals be taken from equals, the remainders are equal:' and if they do not understand this in words, and indeed they do not, it has to be shown to them with the hands, and put before their eyes, and even with all this no one succeeds in convincing them of the truth of our holy religion.
If we embrace the tenets of those who oppose the adoption of the proposed Constitution, as the standard of our political creed, we cannot fail to verify the gloomy doctrines which predict the impracticability of a national system pervading entire limits of the present Confederacy.
Them feet-folks from York and Leeds that be always eatin'cured herrin's and drinkin' tea an' lookin' out to buy cheap jet would creed aught.
That is to say," replied Villefort with hesitation, "that human nature being weak, every man, according to your creed, has committed faults.
the Catholic creed, and not as rendered here "fidelity" and "faithful.