creek


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Creek

 (krēk)
n. pl. Creek or Creeks
1.
a. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting eastern Alabama, southwest Georgia, and northwest Florida and now located in central Oklahoma and southern Alabama. The Creek were removed to Indian Territory in the 1830s.
b. The Muskogean language of the Creek.
2.
a. A Native American confederacy made up of the Creek and various smaller southeast tribes.
b. A member of this confederacy. In all senses also called Muskogee1.

[From the picturesque creeks near which they lived.]

creek

 (krēk, krĭk)
n.
1. A small stream, often a shallow or intermittent tributary to a river. Also called regionally branch, brook1, kill2, run.
2. A channel or stream running through a salt marsh: tidal creeks teeming with shore wildlife.
3. Chiefly British A small inlet in a shoreline, extending farther inland than a cove.
Idiom:
up the creek (without a paddle) Informal
In a difficult, unfortunate, or inextricable position.

[Middle English creke, probably from Old Norse kriki, bend.]

creek

(kriːk)
n
1. (Physical Geography) chiefly Brit a narrow inlet or bay, esp of the sea
2. (Physical Geography) US and Canadian and Austral and NZ a small stream or tributary
3. up the creek slang in trouble; in a difficult position
[C13: from Old Norse kriki nook; related to Middle Dutch krēke creek, inlet]

Creek

(kriːk)
npl Creek or Creeks
1. (Peoples) a member of a confederacy of Native American peoples formerly living in Georgia and Alabama, now chiefly in Oklahoma
2. (Languages) any of the languages of these peoples, belonging to the Muskhogean family

creek

(krik, krɪk)

n.
1. a stream smaller than a river.
2. a stream or channel in a coastal marsh.
3. a recess or inlet in the shore of the sea.
4. an estuary.
Idioms:
up the creek, Slang. in a difficult or seemingly hopeless situation.
[1200–50; Middle English creke, variant of crike < Old Norse kriki bend, crook]

Creek

(krik)

n., pl. Creeks, (esp. collectively) Creek.
1. a member of a loose confederacy of American Indian peoples that in the 18th century occupied the greater part of Georgia and Alabama: forcibly removed to the Indian Territory in 1834–37.
3. the Muskogean language spoken by the Muskogee.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creek - a natural stream of water smaller than a river (and often a tributary of a river)creek - a natural stream of water smaller than a river (and often a tributary of a river); "the creek dried up every summer"
brooklet - a small brook
stream, watercourse - a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth
2.Creek - any member of the Creek Confederacy (especially the Muskogee) formerly living in Georgia and Alabama but now chiefly in Oklahoma
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived

creek

noun
1. inlet, bay, cove, bight, firth or frith (Scot.) The offshore fishermen took shelter from the storm in a creek.
2. (U.S., Canad., Austral., & N.Z.) stream, brook, tributary, bayou, rivulet, watercourse, streamlet, runnel Follow Austin Creek for a few miles.

creek

noun
A small stream:
Chiefly Regional: branch, kill, run.
Translations
جَدولخَليج صغير
potokzátoka
bækbiflodbugtindskæringvandløb
poukamapuro
kis öböl
lækurvík, vogur
upelis
līcisupīte

creek

[kriːk] N (Brit) (= inlet) → cala f, ensenada f (US) (= stream) → riachuelo m
up the creek (without a paddle) (= in difficulties) → en un lío or (LAm) aprieto

creek

[ˈkriːk] n
(= inlet) → bras m de mer
(US) (= stream) → ruisseau m, petit cours m d'eau
to be up the creek → être mal barré
to be up shit creek, to be up shit creek without a paddle → être dans la merde jusqu'au cou

creek

n (esp Brit: = inlet) → (kleine) Bucht; (US: = brook) → Bach m; to be up the creek (without a paddle) (inf: = be in trouble) → in der Tinte sitzen (inf); (= be completely wrong)auf dem falschen Dampfer sein (inf)

creek

[kriːk] n (inlet) → insenatura (Am) → piccolo fiume m

creek

(kriːk) noun
1. a small inlet, especially off a river.
2. (American) a small river.
References in classic literature ?
The man who had proclaimed himself the only true servant of God in all the valley of Wine Creek, and who had wanted God to send him a sign of approval by way of a son out of the womb of Kather- ine, began to think that at last his prayers had been answered.
I did not believe that my dead father and mother were watching me from up there; they would still be looking for me at the sheep-fold down by the creek, or along the white road that led to the mountain pastures.
Here and there would be a bridge crossing a filthy creek, with hard-baked mud shores and dingy sheds and docks along it; here and there would be a railroad crossing, with a tangle of switches, and locomotives puffing, and rattling freight cars filing by; here and there would be a great factory, a dingy building with innumerable windows in it, and immense volumes of smoke pouring from the chimneys, darkening the air above and making filthy the earth beneath.
Now I think on 't, I think I hearn 'em tell that dat ar road was all fenced up and down by der creek, and thar, an't it, Andy?
But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then,
He had given Demby but few stripes, when, to get rid of the scourging, he ran and plunged himself into a creek, and stood there at the depth of his shoulders, refusing to come out.
There goes Friday, running for his life to the little creek.
Here and there, the set of the current had worn down the bank into a little creek, and we were all suspicious of such places, and eyed them nervously.
On the 17th, we came in full view of a great island, or continent (for we knew not whether;) on the south side whereof was a small neck of land jutting out into the sea, and a creek too shallow to hold a ship of above one hundred tons.
The sailors ran the ship into a creek, where ten slaves landed, carrying spades and pickaxes.
It were an occupation peculiarly pleasing to cull from our early historians, and exhibit before you every detail of this transaction; to carry you in imagination on board their bark at the first moment of her arrival in the bay; to accompany Carver, Winslow, Bradford, and Standish, in all their excursions upon the desolate coast; to follow them into every rivulet and creek where they endeavored to find a firm footing, and to fix, with a pause of delight and exultation, the instant when the first of these heroic adventurers alighted on the spot where you, their descendants, now enjoy the glorious and happy reward of their labors.
Meanwhile, the wind having changed we were compelled to head for the land, and ply our oars to avoid being driven on shore; but it was our good fortune to reach a creek that lies on one side of a small promontory or cape, called by the Moors that of the "Cava rumia," which in our language means "the wicked Christian woman;" for it is a tradition among them that La Cava, through whom Spain was lost, lies buried at that spot; "cava" in their language meaning "wicked woman," and "rumia" "Christian;" moreover, they count it unlucky to anchor there when necessity compels them, and they never do so otherwise.