creeping


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creep·ing

 (krē′pĭng)
adj.
1. Developing gradually over a period of time: "a creeping sense of cultural dread" (Andrew Sullivan).
2. Botany Having stems that creep along the ground and root at intervals.

creeping

(ˈkriːpɪŋ)
adj
1. (Botany) (of a plant) having a stem that grows horizontally along the ground and throws out roots at intervals
2. censorious (of a process or change) happening slowly and stealthily, without being noticed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creeping - a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the bodycreeping - a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body; "a crawl was all that the injured man could manage"; "the traffic moved at a creep"
locomotion, travel - self-propelled movement
Translations

creeping

[ˈkriːpɪŋ]
A. ADJ (Med etc) → progresivo; [barrage] → móvil
B. CPD creeping inflation Ninflación f progresiva

creeping

[ˈkriːpɪŋ] adj (plant) → rampicante
creeping paralysis → paralisi f progressiva
References in classic literature ?
thought John, creeping to the bedside, hoping to find his rebellious heir asleep.
Sometimes she stayed in the room with him all day, walking about and occasionally creeping close to touch him tenderly with her hands, and then other days came when she did not want to see or be near the tiny bit of humanity that had come into the house.
The lady in black, creeping behind them, looked a trifle paler and more jaded than usual.
A low, rustling sound next drew his attention behind him, and turning his head, he beheld Uncas within a few feet, creeping to his side.
And it is like a woman stooping down and creeping about behind that pattern.
At last, after creeping, as it were, for such a length of time along the utmost verge of the opaque puddle of obscurity, they had taken that downright plunge which, sooner or later, is the destiny of all families, whether princely or plebeian.
The new inhabitant -- who came himself from a foreign land, or whose father or grandfather came -- has little claim to be called a Salemite; he has no conception of the oyster -- like tenacity with which an old settler, over whom his third century is creeping, clings to the spot where his successive generations have been embedded.
For me, I silently recalled the mysterious shadows I had seen creeping on board the Pequod during the dim Nantucket dawn, as well as the enigmatical hintings of the unaccountable Elijah.
So that --let us say it again --no dying Chaldee or Greek had higher and holier thoughts than those, whose mysterious shades you saw creeping over the face of poor Queequeg, as he quietly lay in his swaying hammock, and the rolling sea seemed gently rocking him to his final rest, and the ocean's invisible flood-tide lifted him higher and higher towards his destined heaven.
I had a very good mouth -- that is I could be guided by the slightest touch of the rein; and that is a great thing in London, among carriages, omnibuses, carts, vans, trucks, cabs, and great wagons creeping along at a walking pace; some going one way, some another, some going slowly, others wanting to pass them; omnibuses stopping short every few minutes to take up a passenger, obliging the horse that is coming behind to pull up too, or to pass, and get before them; perhaps you try to pass, but just then something else comes dashing in through the narrow opening, and you have to keep in behind the omnibus again; presently you think you see a chance, and manage to get to the front, going so near the wheels on each side that half an inch nearer and they would scrape.
Here was a great hole, perhaps two city blocks square, and with long files of garbage wagons creeping into it.
During this brief colloquy, Eliza had been taking her leave of her kind friend, Rachel, and was handed into the carriage by Simeon, and, creeping into the back part with her boy, sat down among the buffalo-skins.