creolism

creolism

the state of being a creole.
See also: Race
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In addition to highlighting, again, the inherent creolism within African American literary traditions, the juxtaposition of the novel and the opera reveals that opera and operatic aesthetics might have played a more significant role within the development of African American literary traditions than previously considered.
I'm drawing here on definitions of creolism from Edouard Glissant, Kathleen Balutansky and Marie Agnes Sourieau, and Ralph Bauer and Jose Antonio Mazzotti, who understand it as the combinatory social practices and products that came into being after the "discovery" of the Americas by European nations in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
His claim that 63% of his black parishioners--both adults and children--could recite the principles of the faith might reflect a high level of creolism (though he also noted that about half of the children die before they reach the age of twelve).
Terms such as hybridity, Creolism, Beur culture, and francophone, as well as the emergence of the postcolonial texts and studies which are now the object of critical discourse - these bear testament to the need for a reformulation of our position in space.
There have been a number of occasions in the history of the United States when a kind of pluralism or, if you want, a kind of mestizaje, metissage, or creolism, was quite feasible.
His work has become more, rather than less, financially interesting now that its obsessions with colonialism, creolism, and history can be plugged into the market's three-year-old concern with multiculturalism.