creolization


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creolization

(ˌkriːəʊlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

creolisation

n
1. (Linguistics) linguistics (of a pidgin language) the process of becoming a creole
2. (Sociology) sociol the process of assimilation in which neighbouring cultures share certain features to form a new distinct culture
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, Corriente does add one potentially important construct in his 2013 work, and that is the idea that Andalusian Arabic is a creole language or has undergone creolization at some point in its past (pp.
Both Hoving and Paquet distinguish conflicting and ambivalent patterns of resistance, subversion, and creation within Caribbean creolization and argue that these qualities, rather than a benign relativity, define creole, and particularly creole women's, texts.
The first part of my commentary will consider how Southern women writers used folk culture in literature of the modernist period, adopting Caribbean articulations of creolization as a lens through which to see the complexities of these literary strategies so that we might reimagine the roles that such use of folk has been given in literary history.
Smith, however, does not present the assimilation/ creolization dichotomy as an underlying theme, she brings it to the forefront of her novel to show that a return to Caribbean works, historically excluded from mainstream Western culture, can play a crucial role in improving aspects of intercultural communication.
Moreover, despite the creative ways in which scholars attempt to introduce movement and dynamism into maps, available data makes it difficult to represent the growing reality beyond the sheer proliferation of group--the intermingling and creolization of a variety of religious practices.
Thomason and Kaufman (1988) note, for example, that the process of creolization may see the simplification of the morphological system of a language co-occurring with an increase in complexity in syntactic structure.
The violence of their efforts warns against a sense that cultural creolization involves merely the intertwining of different cultural strands.
This is all the more unfortunate considering the unique evolution of Israeli Hebrew: it is the only language which emerged by means other than parent-to-child transmission or creolization, and it is the only successfully introduced language with artificial origins.
Binaries related to margin-hinterland, majority-minority, hybridity, multiplicity, creolization, cross-nationalism, diaspora, reflection of the Other, and notions of imagined societies are all integral to the discourse associated with the purportedly "international" in Canadian literature.
Like its counterpart in American geography, "New Orleans home of the Blues," on the map of Dublin Blues Kilbarrack has become the terrain of cultural creolization.
African-American Dance artist, actress and choreographer Marlies Yearby goes so far as to define all dance as Black Dance as a result of the African origin of rhythms used in ballet and modern dance and as such, states that dance is "as interconnected and mixed up as the blood," underscoring the Creolization in Gottschild's earlier remark (13.
The Caribbean "drummer" archetype represents creolization, for what amplifies the drummer's rhythmic presence is a rhapsodic West Indian identity.