creolization


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

creolization

(ˌkriːəʊlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

creolisation

n
1. (Linguistics) linguistics (of a pidgin language) the process of becoming a creole
2. (Sociology) sociol the process of assimilation in which neighbouring cultures share certain features to form a new distinct culture
References in periodicals archive ?
This middle volume on Middle English considers traditional linguistic matters such as phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, but also less traditional ones such as creolization, sociolinguistics, literary language in Chaucer and others, pragmatics and discourse, dialectology, standardization, language contacts, and multilingualism.
But she pursues many avenues along the way, tracing the route of creolization and "inventions," telling an "object history" of the Virgin's celebrated effigies, and, finally, detailing the way Cubans have deployed the Virgin in the streets to press claims about their collective identities.
Creolization is discussed in regards to racial connotations, cultural interactions, and music.
Francophone, Anglophone, Dutch and Spanish creolization in the Caribbean is examined to reveal reconfigured national and regional identities.
She brings together the Creolistes of the Francophone Caribbean, Confiant, Bernabe, and Chamoiseau, with Glissant, Mikhail Bahktin, Lefebvre, and Francois Rabelais to explain how the recognition and practice of creolization in language, architecture, and literature challenge Western colonial ideologies that refuse Caribbean reality and continue to alienate the region from itself.
In the final chapter, Manuel considers the study's implications for our understanding of diaspora, Indo-Caribbean music and culture (especially as they relate to AfroCreole culture), and the notion of Caribbean creolization.
There he presented his influential paper "Acculturation and the Cultural Matrix of Creolization," which would become one of the most frequently cited articles in the field.
Burgos's lyric "suggests the importance of the process of creolization and syncretism in defining the Americas and the Caribbean/' writes Perez Rosario, for the Rio Grande de Loiza, too, "opens into the Atlantic Ocean.
In other works, Candido is developing ideas on women's roles as landowners and traders in precolonial Benguela, and here she shows clearly how fundamental the place of female agency and entrepreneurship was to the emergence of the creolized societies of Benguela; creolization, she shows, was a product of both African and women's agency as well as the violence that accompanied the Atlantic slave trade in Benguela.
In fact, Corriente does add one potentially important construct in his 2013 work, and that is the idea that Andalusian Arabic is a creole language or has undergone creolization at some point in its past (pp.
Finally, I propose that there is a tendency in the debate of simplifying many complex historical and social processes, specifically the process of creolization, especially in the form of the rural populations known as jibaros, and of ignoring the diversity of cultural identities and expressions at local levels within the Island.
By working, in part, to both merge and overturn a historical narrative of "creolization" that prioritized jus sanguinis (the right of blood) over jus soli (territorial rights), the Jamaican rebels invite a more careful consideration of the work of intercultural performance and creolization to inaugurate political change (Gerbi 182).