creolized


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to creolized: creolized language, creole

creolized

(ˈkriːəˌlaɪzd) or

creolised

adj
(Languages) (of a language) incorporating a considerable range of features from one or more unrelated languages, as the result of contact between language communities
Translations

creolized

adjkreolisiert
References in periodicals archive ?
They both speak creolized French and during recess--their only asylum from adults--play the forbidden Good Underwear game.
The poetic word is, above all, a creolized word, a complex juncture of oral and written language.
44) Patrick Manning, The African Diaspora: A History Through Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 2009), 7; in contrast to the Afrocentricity, "The Black Atlantic" model, popularized by Afro-British sociologist Paul Gilroy, puts greater emphasis on the non-essentialist, hybrid, and creolized nature or character of the African Diapora as well as underscores the interaction and exchange between the people of the African ancestry and white people in North America, The Black Atlantic: The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double-Consciousness (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1993).
Put otherwise, the result of this kind of hybridization is a composite (a vicarious or creolized entity) of a higher order, a new reality that cannot be judged from the standpoint of its components and in fact would have seemed implausible or improbable (and may remain invisible) from the standpoint of the previous situation.
14) As such, American identity is not a positive, productive, dynamic, dialectical, self-contradictory, unpredictable creolized identity ("identity" understood as a cultural or communal self-image), as Glissant envisions it, but, on the contrary, a homogeneous, conformist, commodified identity that works against contradiction, against the ideal of a "chaotic" but nonetheless culturally productive world-totality.
Ammons, Betty Adcock, Charles Wright, Judy Jordan, Kate Daniels), the field should expand to heed the call of poets of color, hailing from notably creolized cultures, including Yusef Komunyakaa, Brenda Marie Osbey, Kwame Dawes, Harryette Mullen, Allison Hedge Coke, and Virgil Suarez.
The creolized blend of Native people with European, Asian, and African may be what Black Elk saw.
I wondered whether the sashes that most of these New York dolls wore around their waists--whether or not they were stuffed or prepared in any way at all--might still echo, structurally, the cords and ribbons formerly used to bind spirits into the Kongo-derived and creolized African, Haitian, and Afro-Cuban minkisi figures that Thompson discusses.
harmony, rhythm, and timbre, parting highlights a creolized identity, one that honors the past while celebrating its Trinidadian-ness: an identity perhaps best embodied by the late diva of parang, Daisy Voisin (1924-1991) who receives only passing mention in a film less about the history of the music than its passing to a new generation.
Rather than have her appear as a Yoknapatawpha resident, a slave from a nearby plantation, Faulkner chooses her point of origin as the creolized city.
Guam is an "important crossroads for an assortment of multinational and multiethnic interests" and is a complex, creolized culture brought on by centuries of "intercultural mixing as the principal form of indigenous social and cultural articulation" (Diaz, 2010, p.
By virtue of its ingredients, vatapa the dish, and thus the song, acknowledges and condones the theory associated with Gilberto Freyre, of a creolized racial democracy constituted by successive generations of African, Indigenous, and Portuguese couplings.