creolized


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Related to creolized: creolized language, creole

creolized

(ˈkriːəˌlaɪzd) or

creolised

adj
(Languages) (of a language) incorporating a considerable range of features from one or more unrelated languages, as the result of contact between language communities
Translations

creolized

adjkreolisiert
References in periodicals archive ?
Continual shifts in place time, and character are accompanied by lively shifts in language that move between creolized forms of English and more standardized forms: "Gracie feel from she is small-small that she will never be like Pansy, eldest child of all, strong and facety, fearing nothing" is the opening line of one of the introductory chapters.
In sum, readers are invited to follow the inspiring ways of creolized Antillanite throughout the collection of essays, announced as "broadly philosophical" (p.
But, more often than not, I champion the dynamic nature of food and how it spreads and is assimilated and creolized and reworked and repackaged.
7) It struck Lomax then that this city--its gallimaufry of races and classes with their rich and messy and fraught creolized culture--was an ideal of American culture at large, and it hit him with the force of revelation.
This essay explores the cultural orientations of what Francoise Lionnet and Shu-mei Shih call "minor transnationalism" in the cosmopolitan and creolized aesthetics of Frank Disla's work, its engagement with difference and exclusion, and its challenge to hegemonic notions of citizenship.
After a third chapter that explores the problem of a common sense philosophy in the context of a creolized America characterized by "competing interpretive strategies among local and culturally distinct communities" (87), Gothic Subjects turns in its fourth chapter to Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter (1850) and an analysis of the role Gothic fiction plays in the cultural emergence of a vast American heterogeneous population--"mass life" or "bare life"--that is not individualized and exists "beyond the limits of elite personhood" (138).
Instead of delving into plays written by Hongkongers, Chan's study, however, focuses on plays that are translated from the Western canon into what she calls "Hongkong-speak"-- the creolized form of Cantonese (with a smattering of broken English, various Chinese dialects as well as Japanese, Vietnamese and Korean) spoken in the territory that is distinguished from the Cantonese used in Guangzhou, Vancouver, Sydney, and Kuala Lumpur, among other Cantonesespeaking regions.
As he argues throughout the book, however, this does not mean that Indo-Caribbean culture is any less Indian or that it is creolized, as in the Afro-Caribbean case.
In other works, Candido is developing ideas on women's roles as landowners and traders in precolonial Benguela, and here she shows clearly how fundamental the place of female agency and entrepreneurship was to the emergence of the creolized societies of Benguela; creolization, she shows, was a product of both African and women's agency as well as the violence that accompanied the Atlantic slave trade in Benguela.
Throughout the early verticalist period in transition--from the 1929 "Revolution of the Word," I suggest, to the 1932 manifesto "Poetry Is Vertical"--Jolas drew on the dialects, patois, and creolized languages he had heard and spoken throughout his circumatlantic migrations to explore the universal language that would become so important to his emerging aesthetic philosophy.
These deacons-turned-rebels were members of an independent sect of the Baptist faith referred to as Native Baptist, a creolized version of the Baptist religion that mixed Christian traditions with traditional African religious practices.
They both speak creolized French and during recess--their only asylum from adults--play the forbidden Good Underwear game.