crept


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Related to crept: crept up

crept

 (krĕpt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of creep.

crept

(krɛpt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of creep

creep

(krip)

v. crept or, sometimes, creeped; creep•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to move slowly with the body close to the ground, on hands and knees, or the like.
2. to approach slowly and stealthily (often fol. by up).
3. to advance slowly and often with difficulty: The car crept up the hill.
4. to sneak up behind someone (usu. fol. by up on): The prisoner crept up on the guard and knocked him out.
5. to become evident gradually (often fol. by in or into): The writer's bias creeps into the story.
6. to grow along the ground, a wall, etc., as a plant.
7. to slip, slide, or shift gradually.
8. (of a metal object) to become deformed, as under continuous loads or at high temperatures.
v.t.
9. Archaic. to creep along or over.
n.
10. an act or instance of creeping.
11. Slang. an eccentric or obnoxious person.
12.
a. the gradual movement downhill of loose soil, rock, gravel, etc.; solifluction.
b. the slow deformation of solid rock resulting from constant stress applied over long periods.
13. Mech. the gradual, permanent deformation of a body produced by a continued application of heat or stress.
14. the creeps, a sensation of fear, disgust, or the like, as of something crawling over the skin: That movie gave me the creeps.
Idioms:
make one's flesh creep, to cause one to be frightened or repelled.
[before 900; Middle English crepen, Old English crēopan; c. Old Saxon criopan, Old Norse krjūpa]
Translations

creep2

(kriːp) noun
(slang) a disgusting person. Leave her alone, you creep.
ˈcreeper noun
a creeping plant.
ˈcreepy adjective
causing feelings of fear etc. The house is rather creepy at night.
ˈcreepily adverb
ˈcreepiness noun
ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlyplural ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlies noun
a small creeping insect.
creep up on
to approach slowly and stealthily. Old age creeps up on us all.
make someone's flesh creep
to scare or horrify someone.
References in classic literature ?
Beth ate no more, but crept away to sit in her shadowy corner and brood over the delight to come, till the others were ready.
For an hour the procession of grotesques passed before the eyes of the old man, and then, although it was a painful thing to do, he crept out of bed and began to write.
He crept up to the front windows and stuck his head in: there was no one there.
The shadows lengthened and crept out like stealthy, grotesque monsters across the grass.
My brother has said that a snake crept into my camp," said the chief to Magua; "which is he?
Christie crept nearer to the edge of the slope in the shadow of a buckeye.
The chicken crept through the pales of the coop and ran, with some show of liveliness, to her feet; while Chanticleer and the ladies of his household regarded her with queer, sidelong glances, and then croaked one to another, as if communicating their sage opinions of her character.
Weight, solidity, firmness -- this was the expression of his repose, even in such decay as had crept untimely over him at the period of which I speak.
Ever since the blow, he had lain in his berth; but that morning, hearing the tumult on the deck, he had crept out, and thus far had watched the whole scene.
They could feel the cold as it crept in through the cracks, reaching out for them with its icy, death-dealing fingers; and they would crouch and cower, and try to hide from it, all in vain.