crept


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Related to crept: crept up

crept

 (krĕpt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of creep.

crept

(krɛpt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of creep

creep

(krip)

v. crept or, sometimes, creeped; creep•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to move slowly with the body close to the ground, on hands and knees, or the like.
2. to approach slowly and stealthily (often fol. by up).
3. to advance slowly and often with difficulty: The car crept up the hill.
4. to sneak up behind someone (usu. fol. by up on): The prisoner crept up on the guard and knocked him out.
5. to become evident gradually (often fol. by in or into): The writer's bias creeps into the story.
6. to grow along the ground, a wall, etc., as a plant.
7. to slip, slide, or shift gradually.
8. (of a metal object) to become deformed, as under continuous loads or at high temperatures.
v.t.
9. Archaic. to creep along or over.
n.
10. an act or instance of creeping.
11. Slang. an eccentric or obnoxious person.
12.
a. the gradual movement downhill of loose soil, rock, gravel, etc.; solifluction.
b. the slow deformation of solid rock resulting from constant stress applied over long periods.
13. Mech. the gradual, permanent deformation of a body produced by a continued application of heat or stress.
14. the creeps, a sensation of fear, disgust, or the like, as of something crawling over the skin: That movie gave me the creeps.
Idioms:
make one's flesh creep, to cause one to be frightened or repelled.
[before 900; Middle English crepen, Old English crēopan; c. Old Saxon criopan, Old Norse krjūpa]
Translations

creep2

(kriːp) noun
(slang) a disgusting person. Leave her alone, you creep.
ˈcreeper noun
a creeping plant.
ˈcreepy adjective
causing feelings of fear etc. The house is rather creepy at night.
ˈcreepily adverb
ˈcreepiness noun
ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlyplural ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlies noun
a small creeping insect.
creep up on
to approach slowly and stealthily. Old age creeps up on us all.
make someone's flesh creep
to scare or horrify someone.
References in classic literature ?
I waited till the darkness came down, then I rose from my bed of weeds and crept like a jackal towards the kraal.
He crept up the horse's leg, sat down under the saddle, and then began to pinch the horse and to prick it with a pin.
A VERY HUNGRY FOX, seeing some bread and meat left by shepherds in the hollow of an oak, crept into the hole and made a hearty meal.
With eyes fixed upon the ground they crept slowly across a strip of the field, returning a little further down in such a manner that, when they should have finished, not a single inch of the pasture but would have fallen under the eye of some one of them.
At his superior's cough Bududreen had signalled silently to the men within the enclosure, and a moment later six savage lascars crept stealthily to his side.