cretic


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cre·tic

 (krē′tĭk)
[Latin Crēticus, of Crete, Cretic foot, from Crēta, Crete.]

cretic

(ˈkriːtɪk)
n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot consisting of three syllables, the first long, the second short, and the third long (¯˘¯). Also called: amphimacer Compare amphibrach
[C16: from Latin crēticus consisting of the amphimacer, literally: Cretan, from Greek krētikos, from Krētē Crete]
References in classic literature ?
And I think that I have an indistinct recollection of his mentioning a complex Cretic rhythm; also a dactylic or heroic, and he arranged them in some manner which I do not quite understand, making the rhythms equal in the rise and fall of the foot, long and short alternating; and, unless I am mistaken, he spoke of an iambic as well as of a trochaic rhythm, and assigned to them short and long quantities.
Fashion cretic Elie Hanna wrote on his instagram page fashionpolice_fp criticizing the "The Flood" series star's look "I will get a heartattack, What is this?
Or maybe the stanza's function is more purely formal: sonically introducing the "t" that will dominate the final couplet, metrically mediating the first line's trochees and the fifth line's cretic with a third line suggesting either.
My first card, left, shows the Cretic leaving Gibraltar on regular sailings between New York - Boston, Gibraltar, Algiers, Naples and many other ports of call on its way to Alexandria ( Egypt ) which was part of the White Star Lines New York-Boston & Mediterranean Service around 1900.
In the extract above, the murdered child's family name, Cassamba, is linked through assonance to 'Labamba' and 'bambino,' evoking a Latino influence, but these words are also linked to the third line, 'bloedsproetsel geschpritztes' through the dominant cretic trisyllabic stress pattern--a relatively rare form of meter.
He makes good use of George Wright's metrical analysis of the poem's asymptomatic choice of an English stress-equivalent of the Latin cretic measure, and of Tom Pendleton's demonstration of the poem's profoundly un-Shakespearean language.
12) The result is an elegant cretic dichoree clausula; for its incidence in Pliny cf.
I speculated that whoever wrote the poem may have been experimenting to see if he really could adhere to a cretic pattern for several stanzas, and if the result seemed odd in some places we are free to blame the poet.
The glyconic was sometimes extended by adding a dactyl ( - U U ), a cretic ( - U - ), or a choriamb ( - U U - ) at the beginning, middle, or end.
In particular, he illustrates the interplay between segments of 4+4 and 3+3+2 morae and the syncopating effect of a cretic foot in a basically 4/4 rhythm.
Schoolboys and undergraduates with no sense of rhythm, compose, or used to compose, verses on this principle, trying to keep their wits, and doing so, if at all, only with considerable difficulty, on sense, idiom, grammar, prosody, and meter, all at once: the place of the caesura, of the spondee, of dividing the tribrach, the law of the final cretic, anapaestic license with proper names, and suchlike elementary manners.
The choice of words may be guided by a possible metrical constraint, Porson's Law: a word-break before a final cretic (-?