crevice


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to crevice: Crevice corrosion

crev·ice

 (krĕv′ĭs)
n.
A narrow crack or opening; a fissure or cleft.

[Middle English, from Old French crevace, probably from Vulgar Latin *crepācia, from *crepa, from Latin crepāre, to crack.]

crev′iced adj.

crevice

(ˈkrɛvɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) a narrow fissure or crack; split; cleft
[C14: from Old French crevace, from crever to burst, from Latin crepāre to crack]

crev•ice

(ˈkrɛv ɪs)

n.
a crack forming an opening; cleft; rift; fissure.
[1300–50; Middle English crevace < Anglo-French, Old French, =crev(er) to crack (< Latin crepāre) + -ace n. suffix]
crev′iced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crevice - a long narrow depression in a surfacecrevice - a long narrow depression in a surface
imprint, impression, depression - a concavity in a surface produced by pressing; "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"
2.crevice - a long narrow openingcrevice - a long narrow opening    
chap - a crack in a lip caused usually by cold
chink - a narrow opening as e.g. between planks in a wall
crevasse - a deep fissure
fatigue crack - a crack in metal resulting from metal fatigue
faulting, geological fault, fracture, break, fault, shift - (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust"
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
rift - a narrow fissure in rock
slit - a narrow fissure
split - a lengthwise crack in wood; "he inserted the wedge into a split in the log"
volcano, vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt

crevice

noun gap, opening, hole, split, crack, rent, fracture, rift, slit, cleft, chink, fissure, cranny, interstice a huge boulder with rare ferns growing in every crevice

crevice

noun
A usually narrow partial opening caused by splitting and rupture:
Translations
شِق، صَدْع، تَجْويف
štěrbina
klippespaltesprække
sprunga
siauras plyšyssprogymė
aizaplaisa

crevice

[ˈkrevɪs] Ngrieta f, hendedura f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] n [rock] → fissure f

crevice

nSpalte f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] ncrepa, fessura

crevice

(ˈkrevis) noun
a crack or narrow opening (in a wall, rock etc). Plants grew in the crevices.
References in classic literature ?
The natural taste and true ear of David governed and modified the sounds to suit the confined cavern, every crevice and cranny of which was filled with the thrilling notes of their flexible voices.
An old rusty gun-barrel, without a lock, lay in a corner, which the mother put through a small crevice, and the savages, perceiving it, fled.
Holding by the door-handle, he peeped through a crevice of the curtain, and saw that the inner door, communicating with the passage towards the parlor, was closed.
She set herself, therefore, to gathering violets and wood-anemones, and some scarlet columbines that she found growing in the crevice of a high rock.
Hard by the farmhouse was a vast barn, that might have served for a church; every window and crevice of which seemed bursting forth with the treasures of the farm; the flail was busily resounding within it from morning to night; swallows and martins skimmed twittering about the eaves; an rows of pigeons, some with one eye turned up, as if watching the weather, some with their heads under their wings or buried in their bosoms, and others swelling, and cooing, and bowing about their dames, were enjoying the sunshine on the roof.
When I was a boy in a printing-office in Missouri, a loose-jointed, long-legged, tow-headed, jeans-clad countrified cub of about sixteen lounged in one day, and without removing his hands from the depths of his trousers pockets or taking off his faded ruin of a slouch hat, whose broken rim hung limp and ragged about his eyes and ears like a bug-eaten cabbage leaf, stared indifferently around, then leaned his hip against the editor's table, crossed his mighty brogans, aimed at a distant fly from a crevice in his upper teeth, laid him low, and said with composure:
All the news that could be gained was that remotenesses of the cavern were being ransacked that had never been visited before; that every corner and crevice was going to be thoroughly searched; that wherever one wandered through the maze of passages, lights were to be seen flitting hither and thither in the distance, and shoutings and pistol- shots sent their hollow reverberations to the ear down the sombre aisles.
The low wall was one of the prettiest things in Yorkshire because he had tucked moorland foxglove and ferns and rock-cress and hedgerow flowers into every crevice until only here and there glimpses of the stones were to be seen.
With an admonitory gesture to keep them back, he stooped, and looked in through the crevice in the wall.
It was paved and clean, but grass was growing in every crevice.
thou seest there is no crevice in my coat of plate Art thou fled?
Now I jumped a crevice, the depth of which would have made me hesitate had it been among the glaciers on the land; now I ventured on the unsteady trunk of a tree thrown across from one abyss to the other, without looking under my feet, having only eyes to admire the wild sites of this region.