crevice

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crev·ice

 (krĕv′ĭs)
n.
A narrow crack or opening; a fissure or cleft.

[Middle English, from Old French crevace, probably from Vulgar Latin *crepācia, from *crepa, from Latin crepāre, to crack.]

crev′iced adj.

crevice

(ˈkrɛvɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) a narrow fissure or crack; split; cleft
[C14: from Old French crevace, from crever to burst, from Latin crepāre to crack]

crev•ice

(ˈkrɛv ɪs)

n.
a crack forming an opening; cleft; rift; fissure.
[1300–50; Middle English crevace < Anglo-French, Old French, =crev(er) to crack (< Latin crepāre) + -ace n. suffix]
crev′iced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crevice - a long narrow depression in a surfacecrevice - a long narrow depression in a surface
imprint, impression, depression - a concavity in a surface produced by pressing; "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"
2.crevice - a long narrow openingcrevice - a long narrow opening    
chap - a crack in a lip caused usually by cold
chink - a narrow opening as e.g. between planks in a wall
crevasse - a deep fissure
fatigue crack - a crack in metal resulting from metal fatigue
faulting, geological fault, fracture, break, fault, shift - (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust"
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
rift - a narrow fissure in rock
slit - a narrow fissure
split - a lengthwise crack in wood; "he inserted the wedge into a split in the log"
volcano, vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt

crevice

noun gap, opening, hole, split, crack, rent, fracture, rift, slit, cleft, chink, fissure, cranny, interstice a huge boulder with rare ferns growing in every crevice

crevice

noun
A usually narrow partial opening caused by splitting and rupture:
Translations
شِق، صَدْع، تَجْويف
štěrbina
klippespaltesprække
sprunga
siauras plyšyssprogymė
aizaplaisa

crevice

[ˈkrevɪs] Ngrieta f, hendedura f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] n [rock] → fissure f

crevice

nSpalte f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] ncrepa, fessura

crevice

(ˈkrevis) noun
a crack or narrow opening (in a wall, rock etc). Plants grew in the crevices.
References in classic literature ?
He was clad rather shabbily (but, as it seemed, more owing to his mother's carelessness than his father's poverty), in a blue apron, very wide and short trousers, shoes somewhat out at the toes, and a chip hat, with the frizzles of his curly hair sticking through its crevices.
All merely graceful attributes are usually the most evanescent; nor does nature adorn the human ruin with blossoms of new beauty, that have their roots and proper nutriment only in the chinks and crevices of decay, as she sows wall-flowers over the ruined fortress of Ticonderoga.
Every few steps other lofty and still narrower crevices branched from it on either hand -- for McDougal's cave was but a vast labyrinth of crooked aisles that ran into each other and out again and led nowhere.
A change had taken place in the weather the preceding evening, and a keen north-east wind, whistling through the crevices of our bedroom windows all night long, had made us shiver in our beds, and turned the contents of the ewers to ice.
At first it seemed that green things would never cease pushing their way through the earth, in the grass, in the beds, even in the crevices of the walls.
No matter what it was, I, the moon-struck slave of Dora, perambulated round and round the house and garden for two hours, looking through crevices in the palings, getting my chin by dint of violent exertion above the rusty nails on the top, blowing kisses at the lights in the windows, and romantically calling on the night, at intervals, to shield my Dora - I don't exactly know what from, I suppose from fire.
It is but a month since they were married, and the rice still lingers in the crevices of the pathway down to the quaint old iron-work gate.
The walls of the apartment were so ill finished and so full of crevices, that the rich hangings shook in the night blast, and, in despite of a sort of screen intended to protect them from the wind, the flame of the torches streamed sideways into the air, like the unfurled pennon of a chieftain.
A little light reaches it through some chinks or crevices, communicating with it and open to the surface of the earth.
In short, the ruins, hitherto so cleverly hidden, now showed through the cracks and crevices of that fine edifice, and proved the power of the soul over the body; for the fair and dainty man, the cavalier, the young blood, died when hope deserted him.
To the west was a great valley, and then, rising far away, great jagged mountain fastnesses, rising peak on peak, the sheer rock studded with mountain ash and thorn, whose roots clung in cracks and crevices and crannies of the stone.
The intrepid treasure-seeker walked round it, and, selecting the spot from whence it appeared most susceptible to attack, placed his lever in one of the crevices, and strained every nerve to move the mass.