crevice

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crev·ice

 (krĕv′ĭs)
n.
A narrow crack or opening; a fissure or cleft.

[Middle English, from Old French crevace, probably from Vulgar Latin *crepācia, from *crepa, from Latin crepāre, to crack.]

crev′iced adj.

crevice

(ˈkrɛvɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) a narrow fissure or crack; split; cleft
[C14: from Old French crevace, from crever to burst, from Latin crepāre to crack]

crev•ice

(ˈkrɛv ɪs)

n.
a crack forming an opening; cleft; rift; fissure.
[1300–50; Middle English crevace < Anglo-French, Old French, =crev(er) to crack (< Latin crepāre) + -ace n. suffix]
crev′iced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crevice - a long narrow depression in a surfacecrevice - a long narrow depression in a surface
imprint, impression, depression - a concavity in a surface produced by pressing; "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"
2.crevice - a long narrow openingcrevice - a long narrow opening    
chap - a crack in a lip caused usually by cold
chink - a narrow opening as e.g. between planks in a wall
crevasse - a deep fissure
fatigue crack - a crack in metal resulting from metal fatigue
faulting, geological fault, fracture, break, fault, shift - (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust"
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
rift - a narrow fissure in rock
slit - a narrow fissure
split - a lengthwise crack in wood; "he inserted the wedge into a split in the log"
volcano, vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt

crevice

noun gap, opening, hole, split, crack, rent, fracture, rift, slit, cleft, chink, fissure, cranny, interstice a huge boulder with rare ferns growing in every crevice

crevice

noun
A usually narrow partial opening caused by splitting and rupture:
Translations
شِق، صَدْع، تَجْويف
štěrbina
klippespaltesprække
sprunga
siauras plyšyssprogymė
aizaplaisa

crevice

[ˈkrevɪs] Ngrieta f, hendedura f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] n [rock] → fissure f

crevice

nSpalte f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] ncrepa, fessura

crevice

(ˈkrevis) noun
a crack or narrow opening (in a wall, rock etc). Plants grew in the crevices.
References in classic literature ?
The glacier's surface is not smooth and level, but has deep swales and swelling elevations, and sometimes has the look of a tossing sea whose turbulent billows were frozen hard in the instant of their most violent motion; the glacier's surface is not a flawless mass, but is a river with cracks or crevices, some narrow, some gaping wide.
It is but a month since they were married, and the rice still lingers in the crevices of the pathway down to the quaint old iron-work gate.
By way of ornament to the dull brown walls, icicles appear in the crevices of the timber, gleaming at intervals in the red fire-light.
In the Parvis, some good women, who had their milk jugs in their hands, were pointing out to each other, with astonishment, the singular dilapidation of the great door of Notre-Dame, and the two solidified streams of lead in the crevices of the stone.
He burrowed in crevices and corners, and found corks and cigarettes.
The mineral waters of Arva Wai* ooze forth from the crevices of a rock, and gliding down its mossy side, fall at last, in many clustering drops, into a natural basin of stone fringed round with grass and dewy-looking little violet-coloured flowers, as fresh and beautiful as the perpetual moisture they enjoy can make them.
He gazed through the open door in which the dry bitter dust of the thrashing whirled and played, at the grass of the thrashing floor in the sunlight and the fresh straw that had been brought in from the barn, then at the speckly-headed, white-breasted swallows that flew chirping in under the roof and, fluttering their wings, settled in the crevices of the doorway, then at the peasants bustling in the dark, dusty barn, and he thought strange thoughts.
Occasionally the air breathed through the crevices of the hut, and the low flame that fluttered about the embers of the fire threw their wavering light on the person of the sullen recluse.
The intrepid treasure-seeker walked round it, and, selecting the spot from whence it appeared most susceptible to attack, placed his lever in one of the crevices, and strained every nerve to move the mass.
When we have been prowling at midnight through the gloomy crevices they call streets, where no footfalls but ours were echoing, where only ourselves were abroad, and lights appeared only at long intervals and at a distance, and mysteriously disappeared again, and the houses at our elbows seemed to stretch upward farther than ever toward the heavens, the memory of a cave I used to know at home was always in my mind, with its lofty passages, its silence and solitude, its shrouding gloom, its sepulchral echoes, its flitting lights, and more than all, its sudden revelations of branching crevices and corridors where we least expected them.
Doubtless he imagined that they were hidden in the corners and crevices of his library, and that they peeped out from among the leaves of many of his books, as he turned them over, at midnight.
Barren sun-dried patches, and little holes and crevices opened here and there by the action of the summer heat, announced that the lawn, like everything else at the farm, had been neglected, in the exclusive attention paid to the claims of the horses.