cricketing


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crick·et 1

 (krĭk′ĭt)
n.
Any of various orthopteran insects of the family Gryllidae, having long antennae and legs adapted for leaping. The males of many species produce a shrill chirping sound by rubbing the front wings together.

[Middle English criket, from Old French criquet, from criquer, to click, of imitative origin.]

crick·et 2

 (krĭk′ĭt)
n.
1. Sports An outdoor game played with bats, a ball, and wickets by two teams of 11 players each.
2. Good sportsmanship and fair conduct: It's not cricket to cheat at cards.
intr.v. crick·et·ed, crick·et·ing, crick·ets Sports
To play the game of cricket.

[Obsolete French criquet, piece of wood, from Old French, stick for a bowling game, perhaps from Middle Dutch cricke, walking stick.]

crick′et·er, crick′et·eer′ (-ĭ-tîr′) n.

crick·et 3

 (krĭk′ĭt)
n.
A small wooden footstool.

[Origin unknown.]

crick·et 4

 (krĭk′ĭt)
n.
A ridged structure made of two adjoining triangular pieces covered with flashing or roofing material and built at the upper intersection of a roof and chimney to divert water and prevent the accumulation of snow and debris. Also called saddle.

[Origin unknown.]

cricketing

(ˈkrɪkɪtɪŋ)
adj
of or relating to the game of cricket
Translations

cricketing

[ˈkrɪkɪtɪŋ] ADJde cricket
his brief cricketing careersu corta trayectoria como jugador de cricket

cricketing

adjKricket-; England’s cricketing heroesEnglands Krickethelden
References in classic literature ?
Van Helsing, instead of his little black bag, had with him a long leather one, something like a cricketing bag.
The Wellesburn match was played out with great success yesterday, the School winning by three wickets; and to-day the great event of the cricketing year, the Marylebone match, is being played.
Instead of the conventional rack of war-worn bats, a carved oak bookcase, with every shelf in a litter, filled the better part of one wall; and where I looked for cricketing groups, I found reproductions of such works as "Love and Death" and "The Blessed Damozel," in dusty frames and different parallels.
He wore a soiled suit of blue flannel with a pair of dirty cricketing shoes; a dingy gray moustache drooped from his lip, and daylight could be seen in two places between the rim and the crown of his hat.