crime


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Related to crime: Crime statistics

crime

 (krīm)
n.
1. An act committed in violation of law where the consequence of conviction by a court is punishment, especially where the punishment is a serious one such as imprisonment.
2. Unlawful activity: statistics relating to violent crime.
3. A serious offense, especially one in violation of morality.
4. An unjust, senseless, or disgraceful act or condition: It's a crime to waste all that paper.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin crīmen; see krei- in Indo-European roots.]

crime

(kraɪm)
n
1. (Law) an act or omission prohibited and punished by law
2. (Law)
a. unlawful acts in general: a wave of crime.
b. (as modifier): crime wave.
3. an evil act
4. informal something to be regretted: it is a crime that he died young.
[C14: from Old French, from Latin crīmen verdict, accusation, crime]

crime

(kraɪm)

n.
1. an action that is deemed injurious to the public welfare and is legally prohibited.
2. criminal activity and those engaged in it: to fight crime.
3. any serious wrongdoing.
4. a foolish act or practice: It's a crime to let that beautiful garden go to ruin.
[1200–50; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin crīmin-, s. of crīmen charge, crime]
syn: crime, offense, sin agree in referring to a breaking of law. crime usu. refers to any serious violation of a public law: the crime of treason. offense is used of a less serious violation of a public law, or of a violation of a social or moral rule: a traffic offense; an offense against propriety. sin means a breaking of a moral or divine law: the sin of envy.

Crime

See also law; punishment; theft.

the act of abetting or inciting another to commit a crime. — abettor, abetter, n.
the condition of having two spouses simultaneously. — bigamist, n. — bigamous, adj.
the practice of smuggling. — contrabandist, n.
a person who practices or advocates corruption, especially in politics or public life.
the scientific study of crime and criminals. — criminologist, n. — criminologic, criminological, adj.
1. unauthorized appropriation of money; embezzlement.
2. the sum embezzled.
Obsolete, the act of stealing or embezzling.
the process of wrongfully or unlawfully dispossessing a person of his rightful real property.
the crime of attempting to influence or suborn a judge or jury by bribery, threats, etc.
a person who practices the crime of extortion or the obtaining of money by threat of violence. Also extortioner.
fleeing from justice, as by a criminal.
the world of gangs or organized crime.
petty dishonesty or fraud. — knave, n. — knavish, adj.
wrongdoing or improper or dishonest conduct, especially by a person who holds public office or a position of trust. Cf. misfeasance. — malfeasant, adj.
fraudulent behavior, extortion, or corruption by a person who holds public office or a position of trust.
Law. an intentional crippling, disfigurement, or mutilation of another.
criminal action or behavior; wrong- or evil-doing. — miscreant, n., adj.
a form of wrongdoing, especially the doing of something lawful in an unlawful way so that the rights of others are infringed. Cf. malfeasance. — misfeasor, n.
improper conduct or neglectful behavior, especially by a person who holds public office.
the practice of being a police spy. — mouchard, n.
embezzlement.
the state or condition of regretting crimes or offenses and being willing to atone for them. — penitent, n., adj.
1. the science of the punishment of crime.
2. the science of the management of prisons. — penologist, n.
the condition of having more than two spouses simultaneously. — polygamist, n. — polygamous, adj.
a repeated relapsing into criminal or delinquent behavior. — recidivist, n. — recidivistic, recidivous, adj.
Archaic. roguish or criminal behavior or action; conduct deserving of hanging.
a detailed description of a person for purposes of identification by police.
underhanded, dishonest, or deceptive behavior or actions.
the condition of having three spouses simultaneously. — trigamous, adj.
the actions of an Irish secret society (circa 1832) whose members committed murders and other crimes. — Whitefoot, n.

Crime

 

See Also: DISHONESTY, EVIL

  1. Crime, like virtue, has its degrees —Jean Racine
  2. Crimes, like lands, are not inherited —William Shakespeare
  3. Crimes, like virtues, are their own rewards —George Farquhar
  4. Murder, like a snowball rolling down a slope, gathers momentum as it goes —Cornell Woolrich
  5. Murder, like talent, seems occasionally to run in families —G. H. Lewes
  6. Outlaws, like lovers, poets and tubercular composers who cough blood onto piano keys, do their finest work in the slippery rays of the moon —Tom Robbins
  7. Passing statues creating new crimes is like printing paper money without anything back of it; in the one case there isn’t really any more money than there was before and in the other there isn’t really any more crime either —Arthur Train
  8. Trying to find out what ultimately drove a criminal to murder is as fruitful as trying to determine what drove fate to choose its victims —Lucinda Franks, reviewing two books about a murder case, New York Times Book Review, March 1, 1987

    See Also: FUTILITY

crime

A crime is an illegal action for which a person can be punished by law. You usually say that someone commits a crime.

A crime has been committed.
The police had no evidence of him having committed any crime.

Be Careful!
Don't say that someone 'does a crime or 'makes a crime'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crime - (criminal law) an act punishable by lawcrime - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
barratry - the offense of vexatiously persisting in inciting lawsuits and quarrels
capital offense - a crime so serious that capital punishment is considered appropriate
cybercrime - crime committed using a computer and the internet to steal a person's identity or sell contraband or stalk victims or disrupt operations with malevolent programs
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
forgery - criminal falsification by making or altering an instrument with intent to defraud
fraud - intentional deception resulting in injury to another person
Had crime - (Islam) serious crimes committed by Muslims and punishable by punishments established in the Koran; "Had crimes include apostasy from Islam and murder and theft and adultery"
highjack, hijack - seizure of a vehicle in transit either to rob it or divert it to an alternate destination
mayhem - the willful and unlawful crippling or mutilation of another person
infraction, misdemeanor, misdemeanour, violation, infringement - a crime less serious than a felony
perpetration, committal, commission - the act of committing a crime
attempt, attack - the act of attacking; "attacks on women increased last year"; "they made an attempt on his life"
Tazir crime - (Islam) minor crimes committed by Muslims; crimes that are not mentioned in the Koran so judges are free to punish the offender in any appropriate way; "in some Islamic nations Tazir crimes are set by legislation"
regulatory offence, regulatory offense, statutory offence, statutory offense - crimes created by statutes and not by common law
thuggery - violent or brutal acts as of thugs
high treason, lese majesty, treason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
vice crime - a vice that is illegal
victimless crime - an act that is legally a crime but that seem to have no victims; "he considers prostitution to be a victimless crime"
war crime - a crime committed in wartime; violation of rules of war
criminal law - the body of law dealing with crimes and their punishment
abduct, kidnap, nobble, snatch - take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransom; "The industrialist's son was kidnapped"
shanghai, impress - take (someone) against his will for compulsory service, especially on board a ship; "The men were shanghaied after being drugged"
commandeer, highjack, hijack, pirate - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"
extort - obtain through intimidation
blackmail - obtain through threats
scalp - sell illegally, as on the black market
bootleg - sell illicit products such as drugs or alcohol; "They were bootlegging whiskey"
black market, run - deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor
fob off, foist off, palm off - sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
push - sell or promote the sale of (illegal goods such as drugs); "The guy hanging around the school is pushing drugs"
black marketeer - deal on the black market
pyramid - use or deal in (as of stock or commercial transaction) in a pyramid deal
ransom, redeem - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
traffic - deal illegally; "traffic drugs"
rustle, lift - take illegally; "rustle cattle"
shoplift - steal in a store
stick up, hold up - rob at gunpoint or by means of some other threat
mug - rob at gunpoint or with the threat of violence; "I was mugged in the streets of New York last night"
pirate - copy illegally; of published material
plagiarise, plagiarize, lift - take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property
crib - take unauthorized (intellectual material)
bribe, grease one's palms, buy, corrupt - make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence; "This judge can be bought"
rake off - take money from an illegal transaction
buy off, pay off - pay someone with influence in order to receive a favor
2.crime - an evil act not necessarily punishable by law; "crimes of the heart"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"

crime

noun
1. offence, job (informal), wrong, fault, outrage, atrocity, violation, trespass, felony, misdemeanour, misdeed, transgression, unlawful act, malfeasance He has committed no crime and poses no danger to the public.
2. lawbreaking, corruption, delinquency, illegality, wrong, vice, sin, guilt, misconduct, wrongdoing, wickedness, iniquity, villainy, unrighteousness, malefaction Much of the city's crime revolves around protection rackets.

crime

noun
1. A serious breaking of the public law:
Law: felony.
3. Something that offends one's sense of propriety, fairness, or justice:
4. A great disappointment or regrettable fact:
Slang: bummer.
Idiom: a crying shame.
Translations
جَرِيـمَةجَريمَـهجَريمَه، خَطأ عَظيم
zločinzločinnosthříchtrestný čin
forbrydelsesyndugerning
rikosrikollisuus
zločin
bűnözésbűnténybűntettvétek
glæpuródæîi; skömm
犯罪
범죄
baudžiamasiskriminalinisnusikalstamainusikalstamasnusikalstamumas
noziegums
zločinkaznivo dejanje
zločin
brottbrottslighet
อาชญากรรม
tội phạm

crime

[kraɪm]
A. N
1. (= offence) → delito m; (very serious) → crimen m
to commit a crimecometer un delito
the scene of the crimeel lugar del delito
a crime against humanityun crimen contra la humanidad
it's not a crime! (fig) → ¡no es para tanto!
it's a crime to let that food go to wastees un crimen echar a perder esa comida
2. (= activity) → delincuencia f
crime is risingla delincuencia va en aumento
crime doesn't payel crimen no compensa
B. CPD crime of passion Ncrimen m pasional
crime prevention Nprevención f del crimen
crime rate Níndice m de criminalidad
Crime Squad NBrigada f de Investigación Criminal (Sp)
crime statistics NPLestadísticas fpl del crimen
crime wave Nola f de crímenes or delitos
crime writer Nautor(a) m/f de novelas policíacas

crime

[ˈkraɪm]
n
(= illegal act) (serious)crime m; (more minor)délit m
Murder is a crime → Le meurtre est un crime.
minor crime → délit m mineur, infraction f mineure
the crime of murder → le meurtre
the crime of rape → le viol crime against humanity, crime of passion
(= criminal activity) → criminalité f
Crime is rising → La criminalité augmente.
organised crime → le crime organisé
a life of petty crime → une vie de délinquance
(= reprehensible action, sin) → crime m
it would be a crime to do ... → ce serait un crime de faire ...
modif
[figures, statistics] → de la criminalité; [victim] → du crime
crime rate → taux m de criminalité crime prevention, crime squad
[fiction, novel] → policier/ière crime writercrime against humanity ncrime m contre l'humanitécrime of passion ncrime m passionnelcrime prevention nprévention f de la criminalitécrime scene nlieu m du crimecrime squad nbrigade f criminellecrime wave nvague f de criminalitécrime writer crime novelist nauteur mf de romans policiers

crime

n
Straftat f; (= murder, robbery with violence etc also, fig) → Verbrechen nt; it’s not a crime!das ist nicht verboten; it’s a crime to throw away all that good foodes ist eine Sünde or eine Schande, all das gute Essen wegzuwerfen
no plVerbrechen pl; crime and punishmentVerbrechen und Verbrechensverfolgung; to lead a life of crimekriminell leben; crime is on the increasedie Zahl der Verbrechen nimmt zu; crime doesn’t payVerbrechen lohnen sich nicht

crime

:
crime fighter
nKriminalitätsbekämpfer(in) m(f)
crime fighting
nKriminalitätsbekämpfung f
crime-fighting
adjKriminalitätsbekämpfungs-, zur Kriminalitätsbekämpfung
crime of passion
nMord maus Eifersucht
crime prevention
nVerbrechensverhütung f, → präventive Verbrechensbekämpfung (form), → Kriminalitätsprävention f
crime prevention officer
nBeamte(r) m/Beamtin ffür Kriminalitätsprävention or Verbrechensverhütung
crime rate
nVerbrechensrate f
crime spree
n to go on a crimeauf Verbrechenstour gehen
crime story
nKriminalgeschichte f, → Krimi m (inf)
crime wave
nVerbrechenswelle f

crime

[kraɪm] n (in general) → criminalità; (instance) → crimine m, delitto
it's a crime (fig) → è una vergogna

crime

(kraim) noun
1. act(s) punishable by law. Murder is a crime; Crime is on the increase.
2. something wrong though not illegal. What a crime to cut down those trees!
criminal (ˈkriminl) adjective
1. concerned with crime. criminal law.
2. against the law. Theft is a criminal offence.
3. very wrong; wicked. a criminal waste of food.
noun
a person who has been found guilty of a crime.
ˈcriminally adverb

crime

جَرِيـمَة zločin forbrydelse Verbrechen έγκλημα delito rikos crime zločin reato 犯罪 범죄 misdaad forbrytelse przestępstwo crime преступление brott อาชญากรรม suç tội phạm 犯罪

crime

n. crimen, delito.
References in classic literature ?
I was a Democrat here in Winesburg when it was a crime to be a Democrat.
She somehow felt like a confederate in crime, and tried to look severe and disapproving.
He gazed at the most appalling sight with eyes and muscles that knew not how to waver, but with execrations so bitter and deep as to denote how much he denounced the crime of his enemies.
It is urged, in your behalf, that at the time you committed the crime of which you are found guilty, you were intoxicated.
Old Matthew Maule, in a word, was executed for the crime of witchcraft.
With an easy condescension, and kind forbearance towards our stupidity -- which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime -- would he forth-with, by the merest touch of his finger, make the incomprehensible as clear as daylight.
Now Jonah's Captain, shipmates, was one whose discernment detects crime in any, but whose cupidity exposes it only in the penniless.
If, then, he were this instant--put aside, that crime would not be his.
It was like some horrible crime committed in a dungeon, all unseen and unheeded, buried out of sight and of memory.
I did it; and after a little he had the idea, and he brought his fist down and said HE didn't believe a nation where every man had a vote would voluntarily get down in the mud and dirt in any such way; and that to steal from a nation its will and preference must be a crime and the first of all crimes.
My companion in crime now unrolled a postage-stamp containing several cartridges, and gave me one of them.
It ain't no crime in a prisoner to steal the thing he needs to get away with, Tom said; it's his right; and so, as long as we was representing a prisoner, we had a perfect right to steal anything on this place we had the least use for to get ourselves out of prison with.