criminogenic

crim·i·no·gen·ic

 (krĭm′ə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) also crim·o·gen·ic (krī′mə-)
adj.
Producing or tending to produce crime or criminality: "Alcohol is the most criminogenic substance in America" (James B. Jacobs).

criminogenic

(ˌkrɪmɪnəˈdʒɛnɪk)
adj
causing or promoting crime
Translations
kriminogen
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first, they draw the structure of companies and the evolution of their organizational makeup, while trying to pinpoint how such evolution may have made them more or less criminogenic.
The services shall adhere to Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) (Attachment E), so that interventions challenge cognitive distortions, address a range of criminogenic needs predictive of future criminal behavioral triggers of relapse, promote the rehearsal of pro-social behaviors, and emphasize positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior.
Mindfulness meditation is thought to modulate these criminogenic agents via several different mechanisms.
Free markets combined with competitive individuals eroded the collectivism found in traditional Chinese societies, creating criminogenic conditions comparable to those found in western capitalist societies.
5) The Kibbutz Resocialization Program is based on the assumption that for offenders to change their delinquent cognitions, identity and mode of behavior, they must be both physically removed from their former criminogenic environment and be exposed to a prosocial system of values and behaviors.
They do so by activating the criminogenic potential of economic, political, legal, and cultural asymmetries, as well as by creating new such asymmetries (Passas, 1999).
The need principle targets criminogenic need areas such as substance abuse, anti-social personality and anti-social beliefs.
This change reflects a growing interest in addressing criminogenic factors that may be present in a delinquent's own family and counterproductive to reform efforts.
I contend that public panics are predictable in that they have little to do with a criminogenic reality and much to do with an economic and political context in which they arise.
Reduction in the risk of recidivism through coordinated program and supervision strategies which target substance abuse and related criminogenic needs correlated with offence patterns and other criminal activities.
Such instruments are used to assess offenders' risk to recidivate through an evaluation of factors that are predictive of criminal behavior, and to help identify offenders' criminogenic needs in order to apply strategies in an effort to reduce future criminal behavior.
All interventions must meet three specific criteria: be based on social learning theory; address criminogenic need areas; and be delivered using cognitive-behavioral techniques.