criminology

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crim·i·nol·o·gy

 (krĭm′ə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and corrections.

[Italian criminologia : Latin crīmen, crīmin-, accusation; see crime + Latin -logia, -logy.]

crim′i·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
crim′i·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
crim′i·nol′o·gist n.

criminology

(ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Law) the scientific study of crime, criminal behaviour, law enforcement, etc. See also penology
[C19: from Latin crimin- crime, -logy]
criminological, ˌcriminoˈlogic adj
ˌcriminoˈlogically adv
ˌcrimiˈnologist n

crim•i•nol•o•gy

(ˌkrɪm əˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the sociological study of crime and criminals.
[1855–60; < Latin crīmin-, s. of crīmen (see crime) + -o- + -logy]
crim`i•no•log′i•cal (-nlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
crim`i•no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
crim`i•nol′o•gist, n.

criminology

the scientific study of crime and criminals. — criminologist, n. — criminologic, criminological, adj.
See also: Crime

criminology

The study of crime and the behavior of criminals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and law enforcement
sociology - the study and classification of human societies
penology, poenology - the branch of criminology concerned with prison management and prisoner rehabilitation
Translations
kriminologiarikosoppi
kriminologija

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Ncriminología f

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒi] ncriminologie f

criminology

nKriminologie f

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] ncriminologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Radical criminologies, on the other hand, situate their critique outside the state-sponsored epistemology of crime and punishment, in an attempt to unveil the symbiotic relationship between the power to punish and the structural sources of social oppression (Taylor, Walton, and Young 1975; Hall et al.
The authors of this text present an analytical framework for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of criminology and a comparative analysis of demonological, classical and postclassical theories; individual and sociological positivism; social process theory; and Marxist, anarchist, feminist and postmodernist critical criminologies.
Among leading criminologists the constitutive idea has now been accepted into the corpus of criminological knowledge as a significant theoretical contribution, and one of the few criminologies illustrative of the postmodernist perspective.