criminous


Also found in: Legal.

criminous

(ˈkrɪmɪnəs)
adj
(Sociology) archaic criminal
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
There was daylight enough for me in the drawing-room below; and there I would sit immersed in criminous tomes weakly fascinated until I shivered and shook in my stocking soles.
Emphasizing selective enforcement against criminous, poor ethnic immigrants and African Americans allows her to combine the growth of a penal state with floods of illegal liquor.
In bringing control over a disobedient bishop and criminous clerks into the picture, Sartore muddies the waters still further, without providing any substantive discussion of how abjuration and sanctuary operated as forms of exclusion, and how they interacted with outlawry and exile.
Through published trial transcripts, press accounts, scaffold orations, gallows broadsides or pamphlet confessions, the criminous slave participates in the public sphere, thereby contributing to the popular opinion that cycles back into deliberative government processes' (p.
John Hudson's study suggests that the infamous clause 3 of the Constitutions of Clarendon (1164), dealing with criminous clerks, not only formed a platform for dispute between the King and his famous archbishop, Thomas Becket, but was also a central part of Henry II's legal reforms that sought to channel legal business into the King's court, via the chief justiciar.
The conflict between Henry II and Thomas a Beckett concerned the power of ecclesiastical courts alone to try criminous clerks.
Research on how attitudes toward Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong evolved from humanitarian in the mid-1970s to outright hostility by 1990, suggests that the Hong Kong media typecast the Vietnamese as "deviant, criminous, aggressive and sinister in nature" (Bun 1990, 102).
All these primitive productions were, of course, transient, flimsy nibblings for the hungry moths of time, and the intention here is to identify those records of murder and malfeasance which may be regarded as constituting the classic literature of the criminous.
This New York Times bestseller, penned by a Washington-based staff writer for The New Yorker (and a former senior writer and first female White House correspondent for the notoriously conservative Wall Street Journal), delivers a solid punch at the neo-conservative 'panic' after 9/11, and it augments a searing 16 October 2007 PBS Frontline documentary 'Cheney's Law' on the real conservative agenda (restoring the 'imperial Presidency' and executive branch) with tactics bordering on the criminous.
Before Poe drew up the blueprint, criminous literature--say, William Godwin's Caleb Williams (1794) or Edward Bulwer-Lytton's Eugene Aram (1832)--was more concerned with society's flaws (which helped produce the criminal) than with the criminal's own flaws.
True, laypeople worried that churchmen would go soft on their own, an essential point behind King Henry's intent to try criminous clerics himself, matched by Becket's defense to the death of his jurisdiction.