cripplingly


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Related to cripplingly: dimly, outlined, dropping by, sought out
Translations

cripplingly

[ˈkrɪplɪŋli] adv
cripplingly high [taxes, debts] → écrasant(e)
cripplingly high prices → des prix prohibitifs
cripplingly high interest rates → des taux d'intérêt prohibitifs
to be cripplingly shy → être bloqué(e) par sa timidité
to be cripplingly embarrassed → être extrêmement embarrassé(e)

cripplingly

adv expensiveunerschwinglich
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References in periodicals archive ?
SO Tata Steel is to slash jobs in Yorkshire because the cripplingly high cost of our electricity contributes to making UK steel uncompetitive.
They have suffered seven defeats in a row, morale is cripplingly low and while Garde has played at Arsenal he has no experience of what it takes to lift a team off the foot of English football's top division.
Keeping an office cool during the insanely hot summer months can be cripplingly expensive.
Now, regular readers of GulfWeekly might be aware of my cripplingly poor art skills and possibly think that because of such a handicap, I would have very little interest in the subject.
But cripplingly high energy costs in the UK - 50% higher than some of SSI's competitor countries - business rates and green taxes have meant the firm was operating with "one arm tied behind its back".
Cripplingly high energy costs combined with the strength of the pound and a flood of Chinese imports are killing the industry and we desperately need Government to stand up for steel and make a game-changing intervention.
Time dairy farmers got a fair deal FARMERS have been taking to the streets and the supermarkets all over the country this week to protest against cripplingly low milk prices.
However, energy is one of our largest costs at our speciality and bar business and we are disadvantaged by the UK's cripplingly high electricity costs.
But millions more are affected - many of them cripplingly.
But I hope he's also aware of the very large costly elephants in the waiting room - treating the world for free, getting a grip on claiming back the reciprocal money from other EU countries, translators, the stranglehold of cripplingly expensive PFI contracts and its failed computer system.