cristobalite


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cristobalite

(krɪsˈtəʊbəˌlaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a white microcrystalline mineral consisting of silica and occurring in volcanic rocks. Formula: SiO2
[C19: from German, named after Cerro San Cristóbal, Mexico, where it was discovered]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cristobalite - a white mineral consisting of silica; found in volcanic rocks
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
silica, silicon dioxide, silicon oxide - a white or colorless vitreous insoluble solid (SiO2); various forms occur widely in the earth's crust as quartz or cristobalite or tridymite or lechatelierite
References in periodicals archive ?
1, silica, as expected, goes through the alpha-beta phase transition at 1,045F (580C) and starts undergoing a cristobalite transition at 2,410F (1,300C).
Then, in 1994, OSHA identified crystalline silica as one of a few top-priority safety and health hazards, and, two years later, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that "crystalline silica inhaled in the form of quartz or cristobalite from occupational sources is carcinogenic to humans.
That lower level would also apply to two other forms of crystalline silica: cristobalite and tridymite.
The proposed 50 [micro]g/m3 PEL for quartz matches 0SHA's existing threshold for two other forms of respirable crystalline silica, cristobalite and tridymite, in general industry workplaces.
Once most available stoneware clay bodies reach the stoneware temperature range (cone 8 to 10), micro fine silica in the clay body forms cristobalite (a form of silica) from silica that did not become part of the glossy structure of the clay.
2] such as quartz, cristobalite and opal), silicates (albite.
Typical high temperature non magnetic minerals found in pyrometamorphic rocks associated with coal combustion appear to include several Fe and Al rich clinopyroxene, melilita, cristobalite, tridymite, mullite, cordierite and fayalite solid solutions, as well as glass (Foit et al.
Occupational exposure and analysis of microcrystalline cristobalite in mullite.
Laboratory experiments indicate that cristobalite can be more toxic than quartz, a known cause of silicosis in workers with long-term exposure to silica dusts, but the reason for cristobalite's increased toxicity is not known, says Sparks.
Cristobalite and trydimite, considered to be the more toxic forms of silica, are thermal transformation forms most often found in steel foundries and in furnace and ladle relining operations where silica is exposed to significantly higher temperatures.