cristobalite


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cristobalite

(krɪsˈtəʊbəˌlaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a white microcrystalline mineral consisting of silica and occurring in volcanic rocks. Formula: SiO2
[C19: from German, named after Cerro San Cristóbal, Mexico, where it was discovered]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cristobalite - a white mineral consisting of silica; found in volcanic rocks
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
silica, silicon dioxide, silicon oxide - a white or colorless vitreous insoluble solid (SiO2); various forms occur widely in the earth's crust as quartz or cristobalite or tridymite or lechatelierite
References in periodicals archive ?
The Popondetta soil is a sandy Andisol formed in alluvially redeposited tephra, with mineralogy dominated by albite/anorthite and cristobalite, and amorphous material (glass) being a minor component.
After seeing these results, specimens then were produced and heated to aluminum processing temperatures (1,400F/760C) to avoid the fast cristobalite formation temperature range (above 1,652F/900C).
It is evident that there is a strong recrystallization from 1150[grados]C, especially the formation of cristobalite and mullite.
Granules are composed of amorphous phase, in mineralogical composition can emit one material cristobalite.
It exists in three distinct forms: quartz, cristobalite, and tridymite.
The DSC curves show endothermic and exothermic reactions during calcination, such as desorption of surface water (H2O), dehydroxy lation (structural OH-groups) and the transformation to mullite and cristobalite, with resultant temperature effects of dehydroxylation and polymorphic transformation strongly dependent on kaolinite structural order (Ece et al.
The broad band is due to the Raman shift of the O-Si-O bending mode, and its position is characteristic of opal-CT (not totally amorphous, but poorly crystalline cristobalite with some tridymite-like stacking; Fritsch et al.
X-ray diffraction analyses show the presence of quartz, K-rich feldspar, plagioclase, amphibole, gypsum, calcite, cristobalite and clay minerals, with probable dominance of illite.
Then, in 1994, OSHA identified crystalline silica as one of a few top-priority safety and health hazards, and, two years later, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that "crystalline silica inhaled in the form of quartz or cristobalite from occupational sources is carcinogenic to humans.
That lower level would also apply to two other forms of crystalline silica: cristobalite and tridymite.