critic


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crit·ic

 (krĭt′ĭk)
n.
1. A person who forms and expresses judgments of the merits, faults, value, or truth of a matter.
2. A person who analyzes, evaluates, and reports on creative works, especially as a profession: a film critic; a food critic.
3. A person who tends to make harsh or carping judgments; a faultfinder.

[Latin criticus, from Greek kritikos, able to discern, from kritēs, judge, from krīnein, to separate, judge; see krei- in Indo-European roots.]

critic

(ˈkrɪtɪk)
n
1. a person who judges something
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a professional judge of art, music, literature, etc
3. a person who often finds fault and criticizes
[C16: from Latin criticus, from Greek kritikos capable of judging, from kritēs judge; see criterion]

crit•ic

(ˈkrɪt ɪk)

n.
1. a person who judges, evaluates, or criticizes.
2. a person who evaluates, analyzes, or judges literary or artistic works, dramatic or musical performances, etc., as for a newspaper.
3. a person who tends too readily to find fault or make harsh judgments; faultfinder.
4. Archaic.
[1575–85; < Latin criticus < Greek kritikós skilled in judging (adj.), critic (n.) =krit(ēs) judge, umpire (kri(nein) to separate, decide + -tēs agent suffix) + -ikos -ic]

critic

critical
1. 'critic'

Critic /'krɪtɪk/ is a noun. A critic is a person who writes reviews and gives opinions in newspapers or on television about books, films, music, or art.

What did the New York critics have to say about the production?
Most critics gave the play a good review.
2. 'critical'

Critical is an adjective with several meanings.

A critical approach to something involves examining and judging it carefully. When critical has this meaning, you use it only in front of a noun.

I was planning a serious critical study of Shakespeare.

If you are critical of someone or something, you show that you disapprove of them. When critical has this meaning, it can be used in front of a noun or after a linking verb.

She apologized for her critical remarks.
His report is highly critical of the judge.

If a person is critical or in a critical condition, they are seriously ill.

Ten of the victims are said to be in a critical condition in hospital.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.critic - a person who is professionally engaged in the analysis and interpretation of works of artcritic - a person who is professionally engaged in the analysis and interpretation of works of art
art critic - a critic of paintings
drama critic, theater critic - a critic of theatrical performances
literary critic - a critic of literature
music critic - a critic of musical performances
newspaper critic - a critic who writes a column for the newspapers
professional, professional person - a person engaged in one of the learned professions
2.critic - anyone who expresses a reasoned judgment of something
authenticator, appraiser - one who determines authenticity (as of works of art) or who guarantees validity
evaluator, judge - an authority who is able to estimate worth or quality
grader - a judge who assigns grades to something
panelist, panellist - a member of a panel
reviewer, referee, reader - someone who reads manuscripts and judges their suitability for publication
taste tester, taster, taste-tester, sampler - someone who samples food or drink for its quality
3.critic - someone who frequently finds fault or makes harsh and unfair judgments
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
carper, niggler - someone who constantly criticizes in a petty way
nitpicker - someone who makes small and unjustified criticisms
roaster - a harsh or humorous critic (sometimes intended as a facetious compliment); "the honoree gave his roasters as good as he got"

critic

noun
1. judge, authority, expert, analyst, commentator, pundit, reviewer, connoisseur, arbiter, expositor The New York critics had praised her performance.
2. fault-finder, attacker, censor, censurer, detractor, knocker (informal) He became a fierce critic of the tobacco industry.
Quotations
"It's not the critic who counts. Not the man who points out where the strong man stumbled or where the doer of great deeds could have done them better" [Theodore Roosevelt]
"The proper function of the critic is to save the tale from the artist who created it" [D.H. Lawrence]
"A critic is a man who knows the way but can't drive the car" [Kenneth Tynan]
"critic: a person who boasts himself hard to please because nobody tries to please him" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"A critic is a bundle of biases held loosely together by a sense of taste" [Whitney Balliet Dinosaurs in the Morning]

critic

noun
1. A person who evaluates and reports on the worth of something:
2. A person who finds fault, often severely and willfully:
Translations
نَاقِدناقِدناقِد، مُتَصيِّد للأخطـاء
kritik
kritikeranmelder
arvustaja
kriitikkovastaväittäjävastustajaarvostelija
kritičar
műbíráló
kritik
gagnrÿnandi
批評家
비평가
kritikakritikaskritiniskritiškaikritiškai nusistatęs
kritiķis
krytykkrytyczka
kritikkritikaocenjevalec
kritiker
นักวิจารณ์
eleştirmentenkitçi birisi
nhà phê bình

critic

[ˈkrɪtɪk] N (= reviewer) → crítico/a m/f; (= faultfinder) → criticón/ona m/f

critic

[ˈkrɪtɪk] n
[system, policy] → critique mf
(= reviewer) → critique mf
art critic → critique mf d'art
film critic → critique mf de cinéma

critic

nKritiker(in) m(f); literary criticLiteraturkritiker(in) m(f); he’s a terrible critic (= very critical)er ist schrecklich kritisch; he’s his own worst criticer kritisiert sich selbst am meisten, er ist sein schlimmster Kritiker; she is a strong/constant critic of the governmentsie kritisiert die Regierung heftig/ständig or heftig/ständig an der Regierung

critic

[ˈkrɪtɪk] ncritico/a

critic

(ˈkritik) noun
1. a person who judges or comments on books, art etc. He is the book critic for the local newspaper.
2. a person who finds fault. His critics would say that he is unsuitable for the job.
ˈcritical adjective
1. judging and analysing. He has written several critical works on Shakespeare.
2. fault-finding. He tends to be critical of his children.
3. of, at or having the nature of, a crisis; very serious. a critical shortage of food; After the accident, his condition was critical.
ˈcritically adverb
ˈcriticize, ˈcriticise (-saiz) verb
1. to find fault (with). He's always criticizing her.
2. to give an opinion of or judgement on a book etc.
ˈcriticism noun

critic

نَاقِد kritik kritiker Kritiker κριτικός crítico kriitikko critique kritičar critico 批評家 비평가 criticus anmelder krytyk crítico критик kritiker นักวิจารณ์ eleştirmen nhà phê bình 批评家
References in classic literature ?
Now, as I had no theory of any kind, don't believe in Spiritualism, and copied my characters from life, I don't see how this critic can be right.
With the example of her mother's weakness before her eyes, she had become an unsparing and distrustful critic, with the sole effect of awakening his distrust and withdrawing his confidence from her.
So also, as regards the Judge Pyncheon of to-day, neither clergyman, nor legal critic, nor inscriber of tombstones, nor historian of general or local politics, would venture a word against this eminent person's sincerity as a Christian, or respectability as a man, or integrity as a judge, or courage and faithfulness as the often-tried representative of his political party.
During this performance, the hermit demeaned himself much like a first-rate critic of the present day at a new opera.
But if I should describe the kitchen grate, the prodigious pots and kettles, the joints of meat turning on the spits, with many other particulars, perhaps I should be hardly believed; at least a severe critic would be apt to think I enlarged a little, as travellers are often suspected to do.
But it has rarely happened that anything has been objected to me which I had myself altogether overlooked, unless it were something far removed from the subject: so that I have never met with a single critic of my opinions who did not appear to me either less rigorous or less equitable than myself.
As the latter have considered the work of the immortal bard as the perfect model from which the principles and rules of the epic art were to be drawn, and by which all similar works were to be judged, so this great political critic appears to have viewed the Constitution of England as the standard, or to use his own expression, as the mirror of political liberty; and to have delivered, in the form of elementary truths, the several characteristic principles of that particular system.
No 'delicate micrometer' -- as has been suggested by one too hasty Spaceland critic -- would in the least avail us; for we should not know WHAT TO MEASURE, NOR IN WHAT DIRECTION.
and above all since Guest, being a great student and critic of handwriting, would consider the step natural and obliging?
Yet when due respect has been paid to this critic of old time, the fact still remains that concentration and suggestion are the two essentials of Chinese poetry.
Lastly, her hair, which, from being light in her youth, had become chestnut, and which she wore curled very plainly, and with much powder, admirably set off her face, in which the most rigid critic could only have desired a little less rouge, and the most fastidious sculptor a little more fineness in the nose.
The person who now entered was an exceedingly brilliant looking girl of twenty, dressed in the height of fashion, and extremely well, though a severe critic might have thought she was OVER dressed for the streets, still she had alighted from a carriage.