crookedness


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crook·ed

 (kro͝ok′ĭd)
adj.
1. Having or marked by bends, curves, or angles.
2. At an irregular or improper angle; askew: Your necktie is crooked.
3. Informal Dishonest or unscrupulous; fraudulent.

crook′ed·ly adv.
crook′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crookedness - a tortuous and twisted shape or positioncrookedness - a tortuous and twisted shape or position; "they built a tree house in the tortuosities of its boughs"; "the acrobat performed incredible contortions"
distorted shape, distortion - a shape resulting from distortion
2.crookedness - having or distinguished by crooks or curves or bends or angles
shape, configuration, conformation, contour, form - any spatial attributes (especially as defined by outline); "he could barely make out their shapes"
straightness - freedom from crooks or curves or bends or angles
3.crookedness - the quality of being deceitful and underhanded
dishonesty - the quality of being dishonest

crookedness

noun
1. Lack of smoothness or regularity:
2. Informal. Departure from what is legally, ethically, and morally correct:
Translations
إعْوِجاج، عَدَم إستِقامـه
křivost
luskethedskævheduhæderlighed
elvetemültséggörbülés
óheiîarleiki
nepoctivosťpokrivenosť
hilekârlıksahtekârlık

crookedness

[ˈkrʊkɪdnɪs] N
1. (lit) → sinuosidad f
2. (fig) → criminalidad f

crookedness

[ˈkrʊkɪdnɪs] n (deformity) → deformità f inv; (dishonesty) → disonestà

crook

(kruk) noun
1. a (shepherd's or bishop's) stick, bent at the end.
2. a criminal. The two crooks stole the old woman's jewels.
3. the inside of the bend (of one's arm at the elbow). She held the puppy in the crook of her arm.
verb
to bend (especially one's finger) into the shape of a hook. She crooked her finger to beckon him.
ˈcrooked (-kid) adjective
1. badly shaped. a crooked little man.
2. not straight. That picture is crooked (= not horizontal).
3. dishonest. a crooked dealer.
ˈcrookedly (-kid-) adverb
ˈcrookedness (-kid-) noun
References in classic literature ?
These rafts were of a shape and construction to suit the crookedness and extreme narrowness of the Neckar.
Medlock had said his father's back had begun to show its crookedness in that way when he was a child.
Staggering after Magdalen, with the basket of keys in one hand and the candle in the other, old Mazey sorrowfully compared her figure with the straightness of the poplar, and her disposition with the crookedness of Sin, all the way across "Freeze-your-Bones," and all the way upstairs to her own door.
Did he not think thc crookedness of their carpet patterns a blemish?
Thus also, those ancient cities which, from being at first only villages, have become, in course of time, large towns, are usually but ill laid out compared with the regularity constructed towns which a professional architect has freely planned on an open plain; so that although the several buildings of the former may often equal or surpass in beauty those of the latter, yet when one observes their indiscriminate juxtaposition, there a large one and here a small, and the consequent crookedness and irregularity of the streets, one is disposed to allege that chance rather than any human will guided by reason must have led to such an arrangement.
All might have gone well even yet, only that, by ins and outs and crookedness of laws, I was shorn like a sheep that is clipped to the quick.
You can experience the lean and crookedness first hand as daily tours of the tower to the base of the Crooked Spire take place Monday to Saturday from Easter to Christmas (PS3.
But he was also the protector of those sick with "unsteady step, trembling limbs, limping knees, bent fingers and hands, paralysed hands, lameness, crookedness, and withering body.
It's a little bit about everything, about tribal bureaucracy and crookedness.
But the EU has been plunged into crisis by plain old- fashioned crookedness.
Frankly, I would have thought the world of racing should be queuing up to thank Francome for having put up such a conservative estimate of the level of crookedness in British racing.
Secondary manufacturers should be attentive to the degree of crookedness of lumber received from different lumber suppliers, particularly when a portion of the mill's red oak lumber is procured from lower elevations (even bottomlands) and another portion is from a supplier located in more northerly or higher elevations.