croppy


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croppy

(ˈkrɒpɪ)
n, pl -pies
(Historical Terms) a person with cropped hair, esp rebels in the Irish rising of 1798 who had their hair cropped as a display of solidarity with the French Revolution
References in periodicals archive ?
La segunda referencia musical que cobra un protagonismo especial en el capitulo es la cancion "The Croppy Boy" (Gifford-Seidman, 2008), que canta Ben Dollard mas adelante.
An executive engineer with the council, Joan Dineen,said that tidal defences would be built around the town s Croppy Rd and up the River Feagle as far as the post office on Bridge St.
It was one of the best striped bass lakes in the state--catfish and, of course, croppy and whites and blacks.
Little Logan Croppy was born on July 9, weighing 61b 11oz.
Her account of a concert given in 1900 'by the Central Branch of the Gaelic League in the Rotunda, at which the eighteen-year-old James Joyce sang [Douglas] Hyde's "Is aoibhinn duit" to the air of "The croppy boy"', is typical in this respect and, reflecting on similar evidence, she concludes that the Gaelic League promoted music as 'a means to an end' rather than as an end in itself (p.
The Croppy Boy," by The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem
They would have neither interfered with a lone thorn bush nor a croppy grave.
13sec Galway scorer Ballymac Tony, and Croppy Returns, who clocked 29.
And when Ben Dollard later sings "The Croppy Boy," the entire population of the bar swoons.
Gibbons, Slieve Bawn and the Croppy Scout: A Historical Tale of Seventeen Ninety-Eight in North Connaught (Denver, 1914).
If required, he could be the ultimate croppy boy within seconds, lamenting the filthy English invasion of his land.
Producer Ralph O'Connell said: "We spoke to truck drivers who park their vehicles overnight along the quays and we had two separate accounts from mid-April of a grave-detail party in Napoleonic era clothing burying people in the Croppy Park.