cross-examiner


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cross-ex·am·ine

(krôs′ĭg-zăm′ĭn, krŏs′-)
tr.v. cross-ex·am·ined, cross-ex·am·in·ing, cross-ex·am·ines
1. Law To question (a witness already questioned by the opposing side) regarding matters brought out during foregoing direct examination.
2. To question (a person) closely, especially with regard to answers or information given previously.

cross′-ex·am′i·na′tion n.
cross′-ex·am′in·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cross-examiner - someone who questions a witness carefully (especially about testimony given earlier)
asker, enquirer, inquirer, querier, questioner - someone who asks a question
References in classic literature ?
Because, my pretty cross-examiner,' replied the doctor:
He was a great parliamentarian who knew where all the skeletons lay and was a great cross-examiner.
The cross-examiner will likely ask only questions to which he or she already knows the answer.
Gapasin's reputation as a relentless cross-examiner began during his career in Las Vegas.
2) Redirect may therefore explain, avoid, or qualify the new substantive facts or impeachment matters elicited by the cross-examiner.
A vocal questioner, a tough cross-examiner of lawyers that come before her, Kennard style and intellectual firepower reminds many court watchers of another Western woman, Sandra Day O'Connor.
If the doctor is aware the cross-examiner has this capacity, he or she is less inclined to be deceitful.
Chief Whip Geoff Hoon, a barrister in his previous life, plays cross-examiner while Downing Street bag-carriers Angela Smith and Ian Austin chip in on politics.
The second alternative to recognition by the witness lies in allowing the cross-examiner to establish the authoritativeness of the literature or author through other witnesses.
Returning to the law, he was recognised as a skilled cross-examiner, becoming a High Court Judge in 1961.
28) For example, a skilled cross-examiner could conceivably force a witness who just testified "the light was red" to admit that it was actually green.
The most feared cross-examiner of his generation, he was famous for his role in some of the most memorable libel cases of the end of the 20th century, including the defence of Mohamed Al Fayed in the Neil Hamilton libel case.