cross-grained


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Related to cross-grained: crossed off, criss-crossing

cross-grained

(krôs′grānd′, krŏs′-)
adj.
1. Having an irregular, transverse, or diagonal grain, as opposed to a parallel grain.
2. Troublesome to deal with; contrary.

cross-grained

adj
1. (Forestry) (of timber) having the fibres arranged irregularly or in a direction that deviates from the axis of the piece
2. perverse, cantankerous, or stubborn

cross′-grained′



adj.
1. (of timber)
a. having the grain running transversely or diagonally.
b. having an irregular grain.
2. stubborn; perverse.
[1640–50]
cross′-grained′ness (-ˈgreɪnd-, -ˈgreɪ nɪd-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cross-grained - difficult to deal with
obstinate, stubborn, unregenerate - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
2.cross-grained - of timber; having fibers running irregularly rather than in parallel
uneven - not even or uniform as e.g. in shape or texture; "an uneven color"; "uneven ground"; "uneven margins"; "wood with an uneven grain"
Translations

cross-grained

[ˈkrɒsgreɪnd] ADJde fibras cruzadas
References in classic literature ?
The little beast, cowardly and cross-grained, as pet-dogs usually are, looked up at him sharply, shrank away from his outstretched hand, whined, shivered, and hid itself under a sofa.
THE coracle--as I had ample reason to know before I was done with her--was a very safe boat for a person of my height and weight, both buoyant and clever in a sea- way; but she was the most cross-grained, lop-sided craft to manage.
He was a cross-grained man, oppressed by a large family, and he resented the superciliousness which he fancied he saw in Philip.
Bunn, as they went away; "but he's a good mixer and never gets cross-grained.
sire, I regret sincerely, and you will regret as I do, the old days when the king of France saw in every vestibule those insolent gentlemen, lean, always swearing - cross-grained mastiffs, who could bite mortally in the hour of danger or of battle.
But notwithstanding these precedents to the contrary, Gabriel Grub was an ill-conditioned, cross-grained, surly fellow--a morose and lonely man, who consorted with nobody but himself, and an old wicker bottle which fitted into his large deep waistcoat pocket--and who eyed each merry face, as it passed him by, with such a deep scowl of malice and ill-humour, as it was difficult to meet without feeling something the worse for.
It was my old cross-grained companion, Professor Summerlee.