cross-pollination


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Related to cross-pollination: Self pollination

cross-pol·li·na·tion

(krôs′pŏl′ə-nā′shən, krŏs′-)
n.
1. The transfer of pollen from an anther of a flower of one plant to a stigma of a flower of another plant of the same species. Also called allogamy, xenogamy.
2. Influence or inspiration between or among diverse elements: "Jazz is fundamentally the cross-pollination of individual musicians playing together and against each other in small groups" (Ralph de Toledano).

cross-pollination

n
(Botany) the transfer of pollen from the anthers of one flower to the stigma of another flower by the action of wind, insects, etc. Compare self-pollination

cross′-pollina′tion



n.
the transfer of pollen from the flower of one plant to the flower of a plant having a different genetic constitution. Compare self-pollination.
[1880–85]

cross-pollination

The transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ (an anther or a male cone) of one plant to the female reproductive organ (a stigma or a female cone) of another plant. Insects and wind are agents of cross-pollination.

cross-pollinate verb
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cross-pollination - fertilization by transfer of pollen from the anthers of one flower to the stigma of another
pollenation, pollination - transfer of pollen from the anther to the stigma of a plant
self-pollination - fertilization by transfer of pollen from the anthers to the stigma of the same flower
2.cross-pollination - stimulating influence among diverse elements; "the cross-pollination of the arts"
influence - causing something without any direct or apparent effort
Translations

cross-pollination

[ˈkrɒsˌpɒlɪˈneɪʃən] Npolinización f cruzada
References in periodicals archive ?
Australian researchers have identified a naturally occurring wheat gene that, when turned off, eliminates self-pollination, but still allows cross-pollination - opening a way for breeding high-yielding hybrid wheat.
The cross-pollination with other building industries.
The treatments performed were as follows: (1) spontaneous self-pollination, in which inflorescences remained protected with nylon bags without manipulation throughout flowering to prevent pollination by insects; (2) manual self-pollination, where flowers received pollen from the same plant; (3) manual cross-pollination, carried out by collecting pollen grains of flowers from the second area; (4) natural pollination, where flowers were not manipulated and left exposed to the action of all flower visitors and; (5) Apis mellifera treatment: monitoring was carried out through the removal of insects of other species so that only A.
The amendments would then allow six "test plots" throughout Oregon, where Oregon State University would study cross-pollination risks.
Carol: F1 seeds are the result of cross-pollination between two specific parents.
There's no reason why Coventry can't become a super power in both codes, with cross-pollination between both sets of fans.
For the stigma receptivity test, we used the direct method of cross-pollination of flowers throughout the day, since according to Kearns and Inouye (1993) it represents the actual capacity of the flower to be fertilized at that time.
The biggest threat, they cautioned, would be uncontrollable cross-pollination that would spread GM alfalfa into the fields of other farmers who wanted to stay GM-free--a reasonable worry given that alfalfa is easily pollinated by bees and other insects that forage over miles.
Because of the risks of cross-pollination, new batches of F1s are often produced every year, which means collecting seed gives disappointing results if more than one F1 cultivar is grown within 50 yards.
They are self-compatible so you don''t need a partner for cross-pollination.
Professor Maurice Moloney, director of Rothamsted Research, said protesters could ruin years of research and insisted the chance of any cross-pollination was minuscule.