crosslinguistic

crosslinguistic

(ˌkrɒslɪŋˈɡwɪstɪk)
adj
(Languages) relating to different languages
References in periodicals archive ?
Crosslinguistic Influence and Distinctive Patterns of Language Learning: Findings and Insights From a Learner Corpus
I will argue in this review that it does provide an overview of existing readability studies, but that its criticism somewhat narrowly focusses on readability formulas while ignoring existing non-formulaic proposals and lacking the theoretical depth and crosslinguistic rigor to really provide an interdisciplinary approach to the notion of readability.
Most classroom studies neglected the characteristics of the word items, therefore these studies are not able to show if formal crosslinguistic similarity between L1 and L2 words truly helps L2 acquisition.
With the Future Behind Them: Convergent Evidence From Aymara Language and Gesture in the Crosslinguistic Comparison of Spatial Construals of Time.
Language Development across Childhood and Adolescence: Psycholinguistic and Crosslinguistic Perspectives.
The project was data-oriented: we mined grammars and worked with language consultants to gather data on given grammatical topics, such as definite articles or agreement or existential sentences, with the goal of formulating crosslinguistic generalizations.
GRAZIANO, Maria y Gullberg, Marianne (2014): "When speech stops, gesture stops: Evidence from crosslinguistic and developmental comparisons".
Inspired by Berko-Gleason's (1958) experiment, Kortvelyessy undertook her own crosslinguistic experiment in order to verify the hypothesis that iconicity is primarily bound to the language of small children--in contrast to the language of adult speakers who prefer to express evaluation by way of morphologically complex words.
His/her answer to the open-ended question of crosslinguistic influences was simple but speaks volumes to this paper's hypothesis: " .
Arik, Engin (2010b) "A crosslinguistic study of the language of space: Sign and spoken languages".
Bilinguals have been found to evidence crosslinguistic interaction phenomena, but are intergenerational changes the result of influence of one grammar over another or, rather, the outcome of internal developments constrained by the linguistic system of each of the languages in question, or by such cognitive mechanisms as processing economy?