crossly


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cross
top: Maltese and St. Andrew's
center: patriarchal, Greek, and tau
bottom: Latin, Calvary, and Celtic

cross

(krôs, krŏs)
n.
1.
a. An upright post with a transverse piece near the top, on which condemned persons were executed in ancient times.
b. often Cross The cross upon which Jesus was crucified.
c. A crucifix.
d. Any of various modifications of the cross design, such as a Latin cross or Maltese cross.
e. A medal, emblem, or insignia in the form of a cross.
2. Cross The Christian religion; Christianity.
3. Christianity The sign of the cross.
4. A trial, affliction, or frustration. See Synonyms at burden.
5. A mark or pattern formed by the intersection of two lines, especially such a mark (X) used as a signature.
6. A movement from one place to another, as on a stage; a crossing.
7. A pipe fitting with four branches in upright and transverse form, used as a junction for intersecting pipes.
8. Biology A plant or animal produced by crossbreeding; a hybrid.
9. One that combines the qualities of two other things: a novel that is a cross between romance and satire.
10. Sports
a. A hook thrown over an opponent's punch in boxing.
b. A pass made into the center of the field to a player in position to score, especially in soccer.
11. Law An act or instance of cross-examining; a cross-examination.
12. The Southern Cross.
13. Slang A contest whose outcome has been dishonestly prearranged.
v. crossed, cross·ing, cross·es
v. tr.
1. To go or extend across; pass from one side of to the other: crossed the room to greet us; a bridge that crosses the bay.
2. To carry or conduct across something: crossed the horses at the ford.
3. To extend or pass through or over; intersect: Elm Street crosses Oak Street.
4. Sports To propel (a ball or puck) as a cross, as in soccer.
5.
a. To delete by drawing a line through: crossed tasks off her list as she did them.
b. To eliminate or dismiss as unimportant or undesirable: "He thought about Mr. Fraser and crossed him off as an unknown quantity" (Scott O'Dell).
c. To make or put a line across: Cross and divide a circle.
6. To place crosswise one over the other: cross one's legs.
7. To make the sign of the cross upon or over as a sign of devotion or blessing.
8. To encounter in passing: His path crossed mine.
9. To combine the qualities of two things: a movie that crosses horror with humor.
10. To interfere with; thwart or obstruct: Don't cross me.
11. To betray or deceive; double-cross. Often used with up.
12. Biology To crossbreed or cross-fertilize (plants or animals).
13. Law To cross-examine.
v. intr.
1. To lie or pass across each other; intersect.
2.
a. To move or extend from one side to another: crossed through Canada en route to Alaska.
b. To make a crossing: crossed into Germany from Switzerland.
3. To meet in passing; come into conjunction: Their paths crossed at the health club.
4. To move or be conveyed in opposite directions at the same time: Our letters must have crossed in the mail.
5. Biology To crossbreed or cross-fertilize.
adj.
1. Lying or passing crosswise; intersecting: a cross street.
2. Contrary or counter; opposing.
3. Showing ill humor; annoyed.
4. Involving interchange; reciprocal.
5. Crossbred; hybrid.
adv.
Crosswise.
prep.
Across.
Phrasal Verbs:
cross over
1. To change from one condition or loyalty to another.
2. Genetics To exchange genetic material. Used of homologous chromosomes.
cross up
To ruin completely: Their lack of cooperation crossed up the whole project.
Idioms:
cross (one's) mind
To come to know; realize: It crossed my mind that you might want to leave early.
cross (one's) t's
To be thorough or painstaking in attending to details.
cross (someone's) palm
To pay, tip, or bribe.
cross swords
To quarrel or fight.
cross your fingers
Used to encourage someone to hope for a successful or advantageous outcome: I think I'm going to get the job offer-cross your fingers!

[Middle English cros, from Old English, probably from Old Norse kross, from Old Irish cros, from Latin crux.]

cross′er n.
cross′ly adv.
cross′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.crossly - in an ill-natured manner; "she looked at her husband crossly"
Translations
بِغَضَـب
nazlobeněpodrážděně
gnavent
reiîilega
dargın bir şekildekızgın kızgın

crossly

[ˈkrɒslɪ] ADVcon enfado or (LAm) enojo
"what do you mean!" he said crossly-¿qué quieres decir con eso? -dijo enfadado or (LAm) enojado

crossly

[ˈkrɒsli] adv [say, reply, think] → avec humeur

crossly

advböse, verärgert

crossly

[ˈkrɒslɪ] advin tono arrabbiato, con rabbia

cross1

(kros) adjective
angry. I get very cross when I lose something.
ˈcrossly adverb
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
she said crossly to the maid who kept her waiting some minutes.
Well, as you like, it doesn't matter," she said crossly.
She was always smiling and it used to aggravate her husband, so one day he said very crossly, 'Old lady, what ARE you grinning at?
Well,' said the old man crossly, 'I think you might give your face a rest sometimes.
Rose was sitting at his desk, working with a boy called Hunter, and turned round crossly as Philip came in.
You're much more forgiving than I could ever be," Anne said, rather crossly.
No one but Colin himself knew what effect those crossly spoken childish words had on him.
I'm sorry I asked you to decide this question," said the zebra, crossly.
I think you'd better learn to control that imagination of yours, Anne, if you can't distinguish between what is real and what isn't," said Marilla crossly.
She showed her annoyance, and asked rather crossly why she had not been consulted.
In fact, what the government is crossly ignoring is the investment in primary education which prepares the base for a healthy development of human resources.
Sure enough, it can't be called a success with attendance barely crossly 50% on average.