crowding


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Related to crowding: Crowding out

crowd 1

 (kroud)
n.
1. A large number of persons gathered together; a throng.
2. The common people; the populace.
3. A group of people united by a common characteristic, as age, interest, or vocation: the over-30 crowd.
4. A group of people attending a public function; an audience: The play drew a small but appreciative crowd.
5. A large number of things positioned or considered together.
v. crowd·ed, crowd·ing, crowds
v.intr.
1. To gather together in a limited space: The children crowded around the TV.
2. To move forward by pressing or shoving: A bevy of reporters crowded toward the candidate.
v.tr.
1. To force by pressing or shoving: Police crowded the spectators back to the viewing stand.
2. To force away by taking up space; displace: Urban sprawl crowded the farmers out of the valley.
3. To draw or stand very near or too near to: The batter crowded the plate. Please don't crowd me.
4. To press, cram, or force tightly together: crowded the clothes into the closet.
5. To fill or occupy to overflowing: Books crowded the shelves.
6. Informal To put pressure on; assail: Dark thoughts were crowding him.
Idiom:
crowd (on) sail Nautical
To spread a large amount of sail to increase speed.

[From Middle English crowden, to crowd, press, from Old English crūdan, to hasten, press.]

crowd′er n.
Synonyms: crowd1, crush, flock1, horde, mob, throng
These nouns denote a large group of people gathered close to one another: a crowd of well-wishers; a crush of autograph seekers; a flock of schoolchildren; a horde of demonstrators; a mob of hard-rock enthusiasts; throngs of tourists.

crowd 2

 (kroud, kro͞od)
n.
1. An ancient Celtic stringed instrument that was bowed or plucked. Also called crwth.
2. Chiefly British A fiddle.

[Middle English croud, from Middle Welsh crwth.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crowding - a situation in which people or things are crowded togethercrowding - a situation in which people or things are crowded together; "he didn't like the crowding on the beach"
situation, state of affairs - the general state of things; the combination of circumstances at a given time; "the present international situation is dangerous"; "wondered how such a state of affairs had come about"; "eternal truths will be neither true nor eternal unless they have fresh meaning for every new social situation"- Franklin D.Roosevelt
over-crowding, congestion - excessive crowding; "traffic congestion"
References in classic literature ?
Everywhere, on all sides, the sense of crowding, moving life closed in about him.
He led us to a hitching-bar where two farm-wagons were tied, and I saw the foreign family crowding into one of them.
All the stories of ghosts and goblins that he had heard in the afternoon now came crowding upon his recollection.
The Virgin crowding all sail, made after her four young keels, and thus they all disappeared far to leeward, still in bold, hopeful chase.
Before the first streaks of daylight there came the crowding throngs of workingmen, shivering, and swinging their dinner pails as they hurried by.
And now ensued the usual turmoil of landing--waiters running twenty ways at once--men tugging trunks, carpet-bags, boxes--women anxiously calling to their children, and everybody crowding in a dense mass to the plank towards the landing.
The assemblage rose, whiffed ceremony to the winds, and rushed for the door like a mob; overturning chairs, smashing crockery, tugging, struggling, shouldering, crowding -- anything to get out before I should change my mind and puff the castle into the measureless dim vacancies of space.
I listened undisturbed to a piece of music that was fifteen minutes long--always expecting some tardy ticket-holders to come crowding past my knees, and being continuously and pleasantly disappointed--but when the last note was struck, here came the stream again.
At last they got out the coffin and begun to unscrew the lid, and then such another crowding and shoulder- ing and shoving as there was, to scrouge in and get a sight, you never see; and in the dark, that way, it was awful.
I was as sorry for her as anybody could be, but the campaign was over, the book was finished, she was sidetracked, and there was no possible way of crowding her in, anywhere.
Aunt Sally and Benny flung themselves at Uncle Silas, screaming and crying, and hugged him and hung to him, and Aunt Sally said go away, she wouldn't ever give him up, they shouldn't have him, and the niggers they come crowding and crying to the door and--well, I couldn't stand it; it was enough to break a person's heart; so I got out.