crowfoot


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crow·foot

 (krō′fo͝ot′)
n.
1. pl. crow·foots
a. Any of numerous plants of the genus Ranunculus that have palmately cleft or divided leaves.
b. Any of several other plants having leaves or other parts somewhat resembling a bird's foot.
2. pl. crow·feet (-fēt′)
a. An iron ball with four spikes arranged so that one always points upwards, used to delay the advance of mounted troops and infantry; a caltrop.
b. Nautical A set of small lines passed through holes of a batten or fitting to help support the backbone of an awning.

crowfoot

(ˈkrəʊˌfʊt)
n, pl -footspl -feetpl -feet
1. (Plants) any of several plants of the genus Ranunculus, such as R. sceleratus and R. aquatilis (water crowfoot) that have yellow or white flowers and divided leaves resembling the foot of a crow. See also buttercup
2. (Plants) any of various other plants that have leaves or other parts resembling a bird's foot
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical a bridle-like arrangement of lines rove through a wooden block or attached to a ring for supporting an awning from above
4. (Military) military another name for caltrop

crow•foot

(ˈkroʊˌfʊt)

n., pl. -foots for 1, 2, -feet for 3-6.
1. any of various plants of the genus Ranunculus, of the buttercup family, esp. one with divided leaves suggestive of a bird's foot.
3. Naut. an arrangement of ropes to support an awning.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crowfoot - any of various plants of the genus Ranunculuscrowfoot - any of various plants of the genus Ranunculus
genus Ranunculus, Ranunculus - annual, biennial or perennial herbs: buttercup; crowfoot
meadow buttercup, Ranunculus acris, tall buttercup, tall crowfoot, tall field buttercup - perennial European buttercup with yellow spring flowers widely naturalized especially in eastern North America
common buttercup, Ranunculus bulbosus - perennial Old World buttercup with golden to sulphur yellow flowers in late spring to early summer; naturalized in North America
Mount Cook lily, Ranunculus lyalii, mountain lily - showy white-flowered perennial of New Zealand
Ranunculus occidentalis, western buttercup - perennial of western North America
creeping buttercup, creeping crowfoot, Ranunculus repens - perennial European herb with long creeping stolons
celery-leaved buttercup, cursed crowfoot, Ranunculus sceleratus - annual herb growing in marshy places
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations

crowfoot

[ˈkrəʊfʊt] N (crowfoots (pl)) → ranúnculo m

crowfoot

n (Bot) → Hahnenfuß m
References in classic literature ?
There the water-flower was the lily; the crowfoot here.
Loughborough's first score came from some sterling forward play and saw Aoife Fehilly dive low over the line for a try converted by Maria Crowfoot.
The Molecules section, on the other hand, allows visitors to build their own models of molecules, view the finished models of simple and complex molecules, or watch a film about British biological chemist Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, who received the Nobel Prize for outlining how several complex molecules are structured.
Northumberland National Park Mountain Rescue Team took part in the hunt for water crowfoot plants, which are an indicator of unpolluted streams and rivers.
The book is filled with quotes and messaged from notable Native Americans such as: Chief Crowfoot, Crazy Horse, Chief Seattle, Chief Tecumseh (Crouching Tiger), Chief Dan George, Sitting Bull, Mourning Dove, Black Elk, Luther Standing Bear, and many others.
At the official opening of the new Chief Crowfoot Elementary School at Siksika Nation this afternoon, Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Carolyn Bennett announced that $286.
My fishing friends tell me that they have not been allowed to fell riverside trees as they are roosts and flyaways for bats, not to mention cover (holts) for otters and home to rare, less obvious species - will we have to fence individual trees to protect them and will the beavers munch the water crowfoot beds so important, I am told, for young fish?
Water-lilies and crowfoot have their roots buried in the mud at the bottom of the pond.
In the junior boys' event, Will Crowfoot crossed the line in second place, closely followed by brother Tom in third.
During the response, crews reported seeing a glow from the intersection of Crowfoot and South Main Road from about a half-mile away.
The dominant fishing method involved a flat-bottomed "John boat," about 14 feet long, and a "brail bar" loaded with crowfoot hooks, each consisting of two wires wound into a four-pronged hook.
The new building, which is set to replace the aged Crowfoot School, will be 3,319 square metres and able to accommodate up to 300 students from preschool to Grade 6.