crutches


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crutch

 (krŭch)
n.
1. A support used by an injured or disabled person, often in pairs, as an aid to walking, having a vertical shaft that is sometimes forked, a horizontal grip for the hand, and a crosspiece that is positioned under the armpit or a cuff that wraps around the forearm.
2. Something on which one depends, often excessively: a mnemonic crutch.
3. A forked support or part.
4. A forked leg rest on a sidesaddle.
5. Archaic The crotch of a person or animal.
v. crutched, crutch·ing, crutch·es
v.intr.
To move using a crutch or crutches.
v.tr.
To support on a crutch or crutches.

[Middle English crucche, from Old English crycc.]
Translations

crutches

n., pl. muletas.
References in classic literature ?
both are tall fellows with whiskers, Fred handsome in the English style, and Frank much better, for he only limps slightly, and uses no crutches.
I saw cripples whom I had seen around Camelot for years on crutches, arrive and pray before that picture, and put down their crutches and walk off without a limp.
These invalids looked melancholy enough, limping about on their canes and crutches, and apparently brooding over all sorts of cheerless things.
Her only association with the word was a yellow face and a nightcap, or a pair of crutches, or a wooden leg, or a dog with a decanter-stand in his mouth, or something of that kind; and she stared at me with the most delightful wonder.
Perfectly cured be certainly was not, for he supported himself forward on crutches to give evidence.
Very good," said Sancho; "but now I want to know- the tombs where the bodies of those great lords are, have they silver lamps before them, or are the walls of their chapels ornamented with crutches, winding-sheets, tresses of hair, legs and eyes in wax?
Some hobbled on crutches and wooden legs; others had received wounds, which were still rankling in their breasts.
He could no more believe that he should so fall in his own esteem than that he should break both his legs and go on crutches all the rest of his life.
Suddenly the door opened, and a woman as old as the hills, who supported herself on crutches, came creeping out.
It is a street of perishing blind houses, with their eyes stoned out, without a pane of glass, without so much as a window-frame, with the bare blank shutters tumbling from their hinges and falling asunder, the iron rails peeling away in flakes of rust, the chimneys sinking in, the stone steps to every door (and every door might be death's door) turning stagnant green, the very crutches on which the ruins are propped decaying.
It was an impotent man, both halt and crippled, and halt and crippled to such a degree that the complicated system of crutches and wooden legs which sustained him, gave him the air of a mason's scaffolding on the march.
Using his long arms as a man uses crutches, and rolling his huge carcass from side to side with each stride, the great king ape paced to and fro, uttering deep growls, occasionally punctuated with the ear-piercing scream, than which there is no more terrifying noise in all the jungle.