crwth


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

crwth

 (kro͞oth)
n.
See crowd2.

[Welsh, from Middle Welsh.]

crwth

(kruːθ)
n
(Instruments) an ancient stringed instrument of Celtic origin similar to the cithara but bowed in later types
[Welsh; compare Middle Irish crott harp]

crowd1

(kraʊd)

n.
1. a large number of persons gathered together; throng.
2. any group of persons having something in common: the theater crowd.
3. a group of spectators; audience: the opening night crowd.
4. the common people; the masses.
5. a large number of things considered together.
v.i.
6. to gather in large numbers; throng.
7. to press forward; advance by pushing.
v.t.
8. to press closely together; force into a small space; cram.
9. to push, shove, or force.
10. to fill, as by pressing or thronging into.
11. to place under constant pressure.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English crūden to press, hurry, c. Middle Dutch crūden to push]
crowd′er, n.
syn: crowd, multitude, swarm, throng refer to large numbers of people. crowd suggests a jostling, uncomfortable, and possibly disorderly company: A crowd gathered to listen to the speech. multitude emphasizes the great number of persons or things but suggests that there is space enough for all: a multitude of people at the market. swarm as used of people is usu. contemptuous, suggesting a moving, restless, often noisy, crowd: A swarm of dirty children played in the street. throng suggests a company that presses together or forward, often with some common aim: The throng pushed forward to see the cause of the excitement.
usage: See collective noun.

crowd2

(kraʊd)

also crwth



n.
an ancient Celtic musical instrument with the strings stretched over a rectangular frame, played with a bow.
[1275–1325; Middle English crowd(e), variant of crouth < Welsh crwth crwth]
References in periodicals archive ?
Tel: 029 2030 4400 SongChain St David's Hall, Cardiff, 8pm Tickets: PS13 on the day A group of 10 noted musicians from Wales join forces for an evening which begins with an ancient melody played on the welsh crwth.
Offerynwraig (ffidil, crwth, fiola) ydi hi'n bennaf, ond mae ei harddull canu yn aeddfedu a datblygu hefyd.
Wales had the ancient crwth fiddle for centuries - in the 18th century there were an estimated 40 fiddlers on Anglesey.
The frontispiece here, far from portraying either the violent ending of the 'last Bard' or indeed any more contemporary political symbolism, incongruously shows a rather gentlemanly bard in knee-britches playing a full-sized harp (not the smaller crwth, or folk-harp), to an assembly of men, women and children on a hillside.
Crwth is the longest English word consisting entirely of consonants.
These two went hand in glove, for poetry was recited, declaimed, chanted to string accompaniment, both harp and crwth ("crowd").
The five players accompany the singers on a range of instruments, including crwth, along with flutes, strings, keyboards and percussion.