cryptogram

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cryp·to·gram

 (krĭp′tə-grăm′)
n.
1. A piece of writing in code or cipher. Also called cryptograph.
2. A figure or representation having a secret or occult significance.

cryp′to·gram′mic adj.

cryptogram

(ˈkrɪptəʊɡræm)
n
(Communications & Information) a secret symbol

cryp•to•gram

(ˈkrɪp təˌgræm)

n.
1. a message or writing in code or cipher.
2. an occult symbol or representation.
[1875–80]
cryp`to•gram′mic, cryp`to•gram•mat′ic (-grəˈmæt ɪk) cryp`to•gram•mat′i•cal, adj.
cryp`to•gram′ma•tist, n.

cryptogram

a message or writing in code or cipher. Also cryptograph. — cryptogrammic, adj.
See also: Code
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cryptogram - a piece of writing in code or ciphercryptogram - a piece of writing in code or cipher
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
Translations

cryptogram

[ˈkrɪptəʊgræm] Ncriptograma m

cryptogram

nKryptogramm nt

cryptogram

[ˈkrɪptəʊˌgræm] ncrittogramma m
References in periodicals archive ?
The prime number with which Mallarme was working, he believes, is seven, and the unique number 707--a hypothesis corroborated by several pieces of ingenious cryptogrammic reasoning, including the homonymic identity of the key word "si" (in the repeated phrase "com me si") with the seventh note in the sol-fa scale, and the discovery that two thematically related sonnets from the oeuvre contain, respectively, 70 and 77 words, while a third ("Sonneten - X") points, like the end of Coup de des, to the Septentrion constellation, named for its seven stars.
Precipitation and fog increase the atmospheric humidity of these mountains, where it is common to find ferns and other cryptogrammic species such as Asplenium onopteris, Polypodium cambricum or Polypodium vulgare (MATEO & AGUILELLA, 1991).
After their many near misses, the paths of the two rivals are bound to intersect because the conflicts and mysteries must achieve partial resolution for both the reader and Humbert, himself now a reader of the cryptogrammic path of paper left behind him.