cryptonym


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cryp·to·nym

 (krĭp′tə-nĭm′)
n.
A word or name that is used secretly to refer to another; a code name or code word.

cryptonym

(ˈkrɪptənɪm)
n
a code name or secret name

cryptonym

a secret name.
See also: Names
Translations
Ökonym
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References in periodicals archive ?
Salameh had a CIA cryptonym, "MJTRUST/2" as a clandestine source, but he was never a controlled agent -- and therein lies the heart of this tale.
For this blinkered reader, convinced that the allusion must be a cryptonym, the text is so elliptical that he wonders whether "'it might even win a Cuban Prize for the best work on gringo espionage'"(188).
The very title of the manual remained something of a mystery and was referred to only by its code name JUPRAK (which fit nicely into Yarmo's theory of acronyms, being both vaguely Slavic and brutal-sounding), and was rumored to be a cryptonym for an ongoing classified operation or "activity" of some unknowable conceit or dimension.
It was decoded by the German paper Tageszeitung like a cryptonym that is synonym of CIA.
Identified by the cryptonym AQUATONE, this Top Secret effort was subsumed in another security access and control system called TALENT.
national archives, the CIA used the cryptonym ''POLESTAR-5'' for the aide, former Lt.
A CIA file on Tatsumi covering the years from 1952 to 1957 shows he was referred to in various ways, including by his real name and the cryptonym as well as through expressions such as ''an informant close to Prime Minister'' and ''an adviser for Prime Minister.
This team recruited 87 Iraqi spies designated with the cryptonym DB/ROCKSTARS, one of whom turned over the files of all 6,000 men in Saddam Hussein's personal security organisation.
Rashkin claims that a cryptonym is "literally a word that hides"; such hidden words might be thought of as the keys to Shelter: given that they are hidden, their presence can be sensed primarily as a summons to search.
A]ug[usta]" is a cryptonym for Byron's doubly bound desire for "peace"--that is, for the perfectly encrypted signifying fragment (a piece or a textualized partial or part-object: object a in Lacan's vocabulary) that promises to free him from his "prodigal ancestry," while perpetually setting him adrift in a fragmentary flow of signifying fragments: "aug" "ht" "usta" "ht" "h'd" "v'd" "I'd" "n'd.