cubism


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cub·ism

also Cub·ism  (kyo͞o′bĭz′əm)
n.
A nonobjective school of painting and sculpture developed in Paris in the early 20th century, characterized by the reduction and fragmentation of natural forms into abstract, often geometric structures usually rendered as a set of discrete planes.

[French cubisme, from cube, cube; see cube.]

cub′ist n.
cu·bis′tic adj.
cu·bis′ti·cal·ly adv.

cubism

(ˈkjuːbɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (often capital) a French school of painting, collage, relief, and sculpture initiated in 1907 by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, which amalgamated viewpoints of natural forms into a multifaceted surface of geometrical planes
ˈcubist adj, n
cuˈbistic adj
cuˈbistically adv

cub•ism

(ˈkyu bɪz əm)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a style of painting and sculpture marked esp. by the reduction of natural forms to their geometrical equivalents and the reorganization of the planes of a represented object.
[< French cubisme (1908)]
cub′ist, n.
cub•is′tic, adj.

Cubism

a movement in 20th-century painting in which several planes of an object in the form of cubes or other solids are presented in an arbitrary arrangement using a narrow range of colors or monochrome. — Cubist, n. — Cubistic, adj.
See also: Art

cubism

(c 1907–23) The style developed by Picasso and Braque in response to Cézanne’s late works, and to African tribal art. The first major painting in this style was Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1906), and the term itself was coined by a critic after seeing Braque’s 1908 work. “Analytic” (early) cubism presented the work from a variety of viewpoints. “Synthetic” (late) cubism introduced decorative elements such as lettering and applied materials such as newspaper (collage) to achieve a balance between the depiction of reality and the picture as an object of reality in its own right. Cubism has been enormously influential on modern art.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cubism - an artistic movement in France beginning in 1907 that featured surfaces of geometrical planescubism - an artistic movement in France beginning in 1907 that featured surfaces of geometrical planes
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
analytical cubism - the early phase of cubism
synthetic cubism - the late phase of cubism
cubist - an artist who adheres to the principles of cubism
Translations
kubism
kubismi
קוביזם
kubizam
kubizmus
cubism
kubizmus
kubism
lập thể

cubism

[ˈkjuːbɪzəm] Ncubismo m

Cubism

[ˈkjuːbɪzəm] ncubisme m

cubism

nKubismus m

cubism

[ˈkjuːbɪzm] ncubismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Such dissimilarities are amalgamated through an essence of Cubism that runs through his entire body of work, creating interplay of opposites.
The term cubism draws on the art critic Louis Vauxcelles' reference to the bizarre cubes he saw in budding artwork that fragmented form into interlocking blocks.
Hosted by Ella Art Gallery, the exhibition titled Passion of Cubism, will feature 14 acrylic works on canvas.
The exhibits involved ceramic creations ranging from the more mundane ceramic sculptures to handmade tile murals, fountains and sculptures integrating cubism into this art form.
1973: Death of Pablo Picasso, Spanish painter and sculptor who pioneered Cubism, aged 91.
In contrast, in these six lectures delivered at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, (the co-producer of this volume), he argues the case for Picasso's impact based solely on examination of some 200 featured examples of his post-World War I artwork which evolved into Cubism.
His love for the cubism of Picasso and the surrealism of Dali and Miro is most apparent in his art; so are the influences by bushmen art and ancient Egyptian paintings.
The most revolutionary change in pictorial language, however, was Cubism.
The warm-up for this year's Sofia Architecture Week started on October 19 with a display of the Czech Architecture Cubism exhibition at the Czech cultural Center [100 rakovski str.
For Cooper, curator of the seminal 1970-71 exhibition "The Cubist Epoch," Lipchitz produced important sculpture only in the short period between those dates, when, under the influence of Juan Gris and Henri Laurens, his works embodied the narrow category of Synthetic Cubism.
1881: Pablo Picasso, Spanish painter and creator of Cubism, was born in Malaga, Andalusia.