cubit


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cu·bit

 (kyo͞o′bĭt)
n.
An ancient unit of linear measure, originally equal to the length of the forearm from the tip of the middle finger to the elbow, or about 17 to 22 inches (43 to 56 centimeters).

[Middle English cubite, from Latin cubitum, cubit, elbow.]

cubit

(ˈkjuːbɪt)
n
(Units) an ancient measure of length based on the length of the forearm
[C14: from Latin cubitum elbow, cubit]

cu•bit

(ˈkyu bɪt)

n.
an ancient linear unit based on the length of the forearm from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, usu. from 17 to 21 inches (43 to 53 cm).
[1325–75; Middle English, Old English < Latin cubitum elbow, cubit; perhaps akin to cubāre to lie down]

cubit

A unit of length approximately equal to 18 in. Originally based on the distance from the tip of the middle finger to the elbow.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cubit - an ancient unit of length based on the length of the forearm
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
Translations

cubit

[ˈkjuːbət] Ncodo m

cubit

nElle f
References in classic literature ?
At length a Reverend Sire among them came, And of thir doings great dislike declar'd, And testifi'd against thir wayes; hee oft Frequented thir Assemblies, whereso met, Triumphs or Festivals, and to them preachd Conversion and Repentance, as to Souls In prison under Judgements imminent: But all in vain: which when he saw, he ceas'd Contending, and remov'd his Tents farr off; Then from the Mountain hewing Timber tall, Began to build a Vessel of huge bulk, Measur'd by Cubit, length, & breadth, and highth, Smeard round with Pitch, and in the side a dore Contriv'd, and of provisions laid in large For Man and Beast: when loe a wonder strange
Other fishes there were only a cubit long which had heads like owls.
When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench a cubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as a drink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, then wine, and in the third place water--sprinkling white barley meal over the whole.
What was it to me whether I were a modest plant, of half a cubit in stature, or the proudest oak of the forest--man or vegetable?
To conclude: no man can by care taking (as the Scripture saith) add a cubit to his stature, in this little model of a man's body; but in the great frame of kingdoms and commonwealths, it is in the power of princes or estates, to add amplitude and greatness to their kingdoms; for by introducing such ordinances, constitutions, and customs, as we have now touched, they may sow greatness to their posterity and succession.
I had nevertheless a fancy for seeing the stars once more and feeling the breath of heaven upon my bandaged temples, which impelled me to search for that which should add a cubit to my stature.
Two other very plausible explanations exist: First, the great flaming star, a foot broad, and a cubit high, which fell from heaven, as every one knows, upon the law courts, after midnight on the seventh of March; second, Théophile's quatrain,--
He said that in trying to escape from him I sprang into the top of a tree two hundred cubits high at a single bound, but he dislodged me with a stone the size of a cow, which "all-to brast" the most of my bones, and then swore me to appear at Arthur's court for sentence.
With regard to giants," replied Don Quixote, "opinions differ as to whether there ever were any or not in the world; but the Holy Scripture, which cannot err by a jot from the truth, shows us that there were, when it gives us the history of that big Philistine, Goliath, who was seven cubits and a half in height, which is a huge size.
Aristotle has stated the dimensions of a cuttlefish as five cubits, or nine feet two inches.
To sketch my meaning roughly, examples of substance are 'man' or 'the horse', of quantity, such terms as 'two cubits long' or 'three cubits long', of quality, such attributes as 'white', 'grammatical'.
Here Hector entered, with a spear eleven cubits long in his hand; the bronze point gleamed in front of him, and was fastened to the shaft of the spear by a ring of gold.